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Modifier eXtension Articles,News,Faqs,Events- organic production (anglais)

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Managing Diseases of Organic Tomatoes in Greenhouses and High Tunnels

mer, 2018/11/21 - 17:20

eOrganic author:

Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Introduction

Production of tomatoes in greenhouses and high tunnels has increased in popularity significantly in the last decade. Both provide the option of off-season production and expansion of markets over traditional outdoor field systems. While greenhouse tomato culture tends to be very high-tech and capital-intensive, high tunnels expand the growing season in both spring and fall with much lower capital investments. Greenhouse and high tunnel systems pose unique pest management challenges. The “protected culture” of greenhouse and high tunnel production may result in lower incidence of diseases exacerbated by rainfall, such as Septoria leaf spot and bacterial spot and speck. However, diseases that are uncommon in open fields may appear under protected culture. Botrytis blight/gray mold (Figure 1), white mold (timber rot) (Figure 2) and leaf mold (Figure 3) are among the most important of these diseases. Late blight (Figure 4) may also occur under cool, moist conditions, while powdery mildew has occurred in many greenhouses under drier conditions (Figure 5).

Figure 1: Botrytis blight/gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Figure 2: Tomato white mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) in a high tunnel. Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Figure 3: Tomato leaf mold (Fulvia fulvum), upper surface (left); lower surface (right). Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Figure 4: Late blight (Phytophthora infestans) of tomato. Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Figure 5a: Powdery mildew of tomato caused by Oidium neolycopersici and O. lycopersici. Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Figure 5b. Powdery mildew of tomato caused by Leveillula taurica. Leveillula powdery mildew is sometimes erroneously called downy mildew because chlorotic spots on the upper surface and sporulation on the lower surface are reminiscent of downy mildew. Photo credit: John Zhang, Bionatur and DPA, Jacotitlan, Mexico.

Bacterial canker (Figure 6), caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, is a very serious problem in both greenhouse and field tomatoes. Bacterial wilt is a serious disease in the southeastern US and in tropical and subtropical regions throughout the world (Figure 7). Pith necrosis, caused by a complex of bacteria, occurs sporadically in greenhouses but can kill plants outright, as well as contribute to a decline in productivity (Figure 8).

Figure 6: Bacterial canker of tomato (Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis). Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Figure 7: Bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum). Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Figure 8: Tomato pith necrosis (Pseudomonas corrugata and other Pseudomonas spp., and Erwinia caratovora). Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Viruses and viroids can wreak havoc in a greenhouse or high tunnel. Some, such as tomato spotted wilt virus (Figure 9) and tomato marchitez virus are transmitted by insect vectors, while others, such as tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Figure 10) and pepino mosaic virus are mechanically transmitted (transmitted by people or tools that rub up against or cut or damage plant tissues). Still others are seedborne. Several viroids including tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid (TCDVd), Mexican pepita viroid and tomato planta macho viroid (Figure 11) have been identified in recent years causing severe problems in greenhouse tomatoes. The viroids are seedborne but are also easily mechanically transmitted.

Figure 11: Viroid symptoms in tomato. The viroid from plants with this symptom showed high similarities to Mexican pepita viroid and tomato planta macho viroid. Figure credit: John Zhang, Bionatur and DPA, Jacotitlan, Mexico.

These diseases can be managed by employing appropriate integrated pest management (IPM) approaches including cultural tactics, resistant varieties and applications of materials approved for use in organic production systems. For more information on disease management materials, see the eOrganic article Can I Use This Product for Disease Management on my Organic Farm?.

Management Strategies Cultural Tactics

Soil quality and soilborne disease management

Organic tomatoes may be produced in “ground” culture on raised or flat beds in soil, in bag/pot culture using soilless planting mix, or in hydroponic culture. In the latter two systems, tomatoes are produced in a soilless planting mix or medium and fed nutrients in liquid form. A clear advantage of the soilless culture methods is the ability to replace contaminated planting mix and avoid many soilborne pathogens (although pathogens such as Pythium sp. can be a serious problem in bag/pot and hydroponic culture). For soil culture, improving soil quality is critical for optimal soil fertility and crop health. The addition of good quality compost is essential for increasing soil organic matter and providing nutrients for the crop. Further, research has shown that increased organic matter results in a more extensive and varied microbial community, resulting in suppression of soilborne pathogens and improved plant health. Our research has shown that tomato plants grown in compost-amended soil in high tunnels had significantly less white mold than those grown in non-amended soil. Early blight was also reduced on tomatoes grown in compost-amended soil compared to those grown in non-amended soil in high tunnels. If a soilborne pathogen problem develops, soil can be pasteurized or sterilized by a number of methods, although these can be costly. Details on soil and soilless culture methods can be found in ATTRA publications Organic Greenhouse Tomato Production, Organic Greenhouse Vegetable Production, and Integrated Pest Management for Greenhouse Crops. For more information on organic soil and fertility management see the eOrganic articles Conventional Chemical Soil Testing within Organic Systems and Organic Soil Fertility.

Rotation

Crop rotation is a cornerstone of disease management for organic crops, but may be difficult to achieve in greenhouses and high tunnels utilizing soil culture. High tunnels can be built as temporary structures that can be moved from one location to another (Figure 12). These high tunnels must be securely anchored in order to prevent structural damage during high winds. For immovable structures, crops should be rotated within the greenhouse between (not among!) plant families. For example, tomatoes should be rotated with vine crops, lettuce, or cole crops, for example. Unfortunately, there are some pathogens, such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, the causal agent of white mold (also known as timber rot), that have a wide host range and attack plants in different families. It is therefore important to scout plants regularly and know which diseases are present in the crop.

Figure 12: Hydraulic drill to secure anchors for moveable high tunnel. Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

*Management tip* When white mold is observed in a greenhouse or high tunnel, the diseased plants and soil immediately surrounding the stem (approx. 6-8 inch radius, 4-6 in. deep) that may contain sclerotia (Figure 13) should be removed immediately from the greenhouse and buried deeply in another location. Growers may also consider applying the biocontrol agent Contans to soil after the tomato crop to reduce the viability and number of sclerotia.

Figure 13: Sclerotia (arrows) of the white mold pathogen surrounding the base of the diseased tomato plant. Removing the plant and the soil surrounding the base from the high tunnel or greenhouse will remove inoculum. Figure credit: Sally A. Miller, The Ohio State University

Sanitation

Proper sanitation is critical in the greenhouse or high tunnel environment. Weeds, which may harbor insect pests and some pathogens, and also reduce air movement, should be removed from inside and outside the structure. Diseased tissue should be removed and disposed of. Cull piles are a source of inoculum and waste tissue should be composted or buried. If composting, choose a composting process that facilitates rapid decomposition and maintains the necessary high temperatures throughout the pile – preferably an active process in which the pile is turned frequently. The composting cull pile should be located as far away from the greenhouse or high tunnel as possible.

Surfaces should be cleaned thoroughly after each crop, and tools should be cleaned regularly. Workers should wash hands often – at least at the end of each row – to minimize spread of pathogens, particularly Botrytis grey mold, bacterial canker, TMV, PepMV and TCDVd. In some operations, workers wear gloves that can be regularly dipped into a sanitizing agent. Tomato greenhouse operations routinely use disinfectant-filled footbaths to prevent movement of pathogens on boots and shoes into the greenhouse. Pruning tools and knives are available that dispense a disinfectant solution during cutting and pruning operations, significantly reducing the risk of disease spread. There are a number of disinfectants/sanitizers permitted for use on organic farms. For more information, see the eOrganic articles Approved Chemicals for Use in Organic Postharvest Systems and Can I Use This Input on my Organic Farm?. Unfortunately, there are few independent studies available to guide the selection of a disinfectant or sanitizer for organic food crop production.

Workers who smoke should dip their hands into whole milk, followed by thorough washing in hot soapy water to inactivate tobacco mosaic virus, which may infect tomatoes. Workers should wear coveralls that are laundered often and stored in a smoke-free facility.

Bacterial canker is seedborne, so in order to avoid the possibility of transmission of this important pathogen from seed to seedlings to plants, seed should be hot water-treated prior to planting. Complete instructions for hot water treatment of vegetable seeds (Miller and Ivey 2005) are available.

Environmental management

All of the foliar fungal diseases are favored by high relative humidity in the tomato canopy. Wider plant spacing and improved ventilation help to reduce the incidence of these diseases. Tomato plants should be suckered below the first fruit set to promote air circulation. Removing the lower leaves as the plant ages also increases air movement around the plants. For high tunnels, the sides and ends should remain open as much as possible to promote air movement. Workers should avoid handling plants when free moisture is present to reduce the spread of pathogens from diseased to healthy plants. Plants should be irrigated without applying water to the foliage. In greenhouses, temperatures should be managed to reduce condensation, and fans or tubing can be used to distribute heated air throughout the structure.

Resistant Varieties

No tomato variety is resistant to every disease that may appear in the greenhouse or high tunnel. In fact, there are no commercially available sources of resistance to some of the most important diseases, such as bacterial canker and white mold. Further, very few heirloom varieties, often favored by organic producers, are resistant to diseases. Check with the seed supplier to determine if varieties with resistance to a problematic disease are available. Organic growers must use organically produced seed if available, but untreated seed that is conventionally produced is permitted if organically-produced stocks cannot be obtained. For more information on organic seed and suppliers, see Sourcing Certified Organic Seed and The National Organic Program (NOP) Regulations.

Nearly all of the tomatoes used in conventional greenhouse tomato production are grafted. The rootstocks used are not particularly disease-resistant, but impart higher vigor and prolonged plant life. Organic growers are beginning to experiment with grafting for soil-cultured tomatoes (Rivard and Louws 2006) particularly in areas where bacterial wilt, root knot nematode or other soilborne diseases are a problem. Preferred varieties are grafted onto disease-resistant rootstocks and allowed to heal before transplanting. While the cost of grafted transplants is higher than that of non-grafted ones, where soilborne diseases are a problem, this option may be more cost-effective than soil pasteurization or sterilization.

Fungicides

All of the diseases mentioned are difficult to manage once they become established, and the fungicides allowed in organic production usually cannot tame a raging disease epidemic. However, if diseases are identified early in the epidemic and all the appropriate cultural tactics have been employed, approved fungicides may be applied to reduce disease spread throughout the greenhouse or high tunnel. For powdery mildew, products containing fixed copper or sulfur can be effective. Fixed copper products are also effective in reducing the incidence and severity of leaf mold and early blight. Plant extracts and various biocontrol agents have shown some efficacy in reducing diseases in organic tomatoes, but they are generally less effective than fixed copper fungicides. However, coppers should not be overused as they may accumulate in soil and are toxic at high levels to soil flora and fauna.

NOTE: Before applying ANY pest control product, be sure to 1) read and understand the safety precautions and application restrictions, and  2) make sure that the brand name product is listed your Organic System Plan and approved by your certifier. For more information see Can I Use this Product for Disease Management on my Organic Farm, and for more information on the use of copper products, see Organic Management of Late Blight of Potato and Tomato with Copper Products.

References and Citations

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 3069

Construction of High Tunnels: Resources for Organic Farmers

jeu, 2018/11/15 - 21:10

eOrganic authors:

Kristin Pool, Oregon State University

Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Introduction

High tunnels, also called high hoops or hoop houses, are temporary structures that extend the growing season. These covered structures are constructed in the field in order to protect crops from the weather (rain, wind, cool or warm temperatures) and, in some cases, pests. High tunnels offer an intermediate level of environmental control—a growing system between row covers and greenhouses. In comparison to greenhouses, they are unheated, provide less climate control, and are less expensive. This article lists publications and videos on high tunnel construction.

The most important issues to consider before constructing a high tunnel are:

  1. Purpose of the tunnel in the farming system
  2. Budget available
  3. Location

Once these issues have been addressed, the next step is to learn about the diverse designs and materials available and select those that best fit the purpose, budget, and location.  

High Tunnel Construction Resources More permanent / more expensive models


Figure 1. Suzy Evans of Foundhorn Gardens in Oregon shows off her peppers grown in a permanent high tunnel. Figure credit: Robelee Evans, Foundhorn Gardens, Oregon.

 Less permanent / less expensive models


    Figure 2. Low cost, movable tunnel under construction. Figure credit: Tim Coolong, University of Kentucky.

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 2310

Breeding Multi-Use Naked Barley for Organic Systems Webinar

ven, 2018/11/09 - 17:16

 Join eOrganic for a webinar about naked (or hull-less) barley by Brigid Meints of Oregon State University. The webinar will take place on December 18th at 11AM Pacific Time (12PM Mountain, 1PM Central, 2PM Eastern Time). It's free and open to the public, and advance registration is required. 

Register now at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2nzGTTGBRM6v26bNUx-nKw

About the Webinar

Barley is a versatile crop with three principal end-uses: feed, food, and malt. Organic barley is produced for all three uses and fetches a significant premium over conventional barley. Most of the barley grown in the United States has an adhering hull, but a small percentage of the barley grown is hull-less, or ‘naked’. Naked barley shows potential as a crop that can be used for food, feed, and malt. The project that this webinar focuses on is directed at discovering paths to create accepted multi-uses for organically-grown barley varieties. The goal will be most readily accomplished by plant breeders developing and releasing naked multi-use varieties with modest β-glucan levels suitable for organic production. Organic producers, processers, and consumers with strong interests in innovation, health, and sustainability stand to benefit directly from the adoption of new multi-use barley varieties. This webinar will cover research on naked barley applications for multiple end-uses and the breeding work being done to develop multi-use naked barley for organic systems.

About the Presenter

Brigid Meints is a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the Barley Breeding program at Oregon State University focusing on breeding multi-use naked barley for organic systems. She earned her MS from OSU in Crop Science with a focus in Plant Breeding & Genetics and her PhD in Crop Science at Washington State University.

The webinar will be recorded and archived on the eOrganic YouTube channel, and will be conducted using Zoom.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 28526

GMO Contamination: What's an Organic Farmer to Do? Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 02:44

About the webinar:
Genetically engineered corn, soy, canola, alfalfa, oh my! What should organic farmers do to minimize GMO contamination of their organic crops? Jim Riddle, University of Minnesota, will share ideas to minimize genetic trespass during planning, planting, production, harvest, storage, and transport.

Resources from the webinar:

Slides from the webinar as a pdf file: http://cop.extension.org/mediawiki/files/0/09/RiddleGMOMarch92011.pdf

List of GMO Testing Labs: http://cop.extension.org/mediawiki/files/c/cf/GMO_testing_-1.pdf

About the presenter:
Jim Riddle has worked for over 26 years as an organic farmer, inspector, author, policy analyst and educator. He was founding chair of the International Organic Inspectors Association, (IOIA), and co-author of the IFOAM/IOIA International Organic Inspection Manual. He has trained hundreds of organic inspectors throughout the world. Jim served on the Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s Organic Advisory Task Force from 1991-2009, and was instrumental in passage of Minnesota’s landmark organic certification cost-share program. Since January 2006, Jim has worked as the University of Minnesota’s Organic Outreach Coordinator. Jim is former chair of the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board, and is a leading voice for organic agriculture.

About eOrganic

eOrganic is the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at eXtension.org. Our website  at http:www.extension.org/organic_production contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 5793

Why Organic Seed?

ven, 2018/10/26 - 02:39

eOrganic author:

John Navazio, Organic Seed Alliance and Washington State University

This is an Organic Seed Resource Guide article.

Introduction

In any discussion about the use of organic seed by organic farmers, there are usually three reasons that are mentioned in support of organic seed. First, there is the National Organic Program (NOP) Standards for the use of certified organically grown seed as established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Second, there is the issue of minimizing the amount of “upstream pollution” that is created by seed production by supporting other organic growers that produce the seed we use. Lastly, there is the important goal of developing crop varieties through plant breeding that are adapted to the organic production systems in which they’ll be grown. All three of these reasons are important in developing an organic seed network that is responsive to growers needs and will ultimately produce seed of crop varieties that are superior in performance to their conventional counterparts in organic production systems.

National Organic Program Standards for Organic Seed

The NOP standards for organic seed that were implemented by the USDA in 2002 were seen as a great first step in encouraging the growth of organic seed within the organic movement. This set of rules requires that certified organically grown seed is to be used by organic farmers when commercially available. Organic seed must be produced and handled by certified organic producers. All seed used in organic production must be untreated, or treated only with substances (such as microbial products) that are on the National List of products allowable for organic production. Commercial availability is based on ability to obtain the seed in an appropriate form, quality, or quantity, as reviewed by the certification agent.

Upstream Pollution

The most immediate effect of using organically grown seed is the potential to minimize the amount of upstream pollution in the seed production process. Conventionally produced vegetable seed crops rely on petroleum based synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. These seed crops frequently receive heavier applications of insecticides and fungicides than the same crops when grown as vegetables. There are two prominent reasons for this. First, vegetable seed crops are produced over a much longer season than the same crop when it is grown to be harvested in the vegetative stage, hence the need for an increased number of applications of crop protection chemicals to continue to ward off insect and disease pests. Secondly, the regulations controlling the amount and types of pesticides that are allowed for seed crops is much more lenient, which often leads to a "more is better" approach with many growers.

 Micaela Colley

Joel Reiten leads organic onion seed field day at Bejo Seeds, Corvallis, Oregon. Photo credit: Micaela Colley

Organic seed production systems that are based on ecologically sound practices with low external inputs have less of an environmental impact due to an absence of these synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. Organic systems executed in a sustainable fashion are able to minimize ground water pollution, erosion and soil degradation. Decreasing external inputs of manufactured materials also reduces fossil fuel use both in manufacture and transport of imported materials. Organic practices may also lead ultimately to a greater degree of biological diversity in the production area which may also lessen the need for pesticides and other external inputs contributing to upstream pollution.

Adaptation to Organic Conditions

The ultimate goal of a growing number of organic seed producers and plant breeders is to develop crop varieties that are adapted to organic production systems. Traits associated with superior performance in organic systems include insect pest and disease resistance, weed tolerance, adaptation to biologically mediated nutrient availability, and tolerance to climatic and environmental stresses, such as cold or wet soils (which is typically managed with fungicide seed treatments in conventional systems).  Varieties developed for these systems will ideally have the ability to outgrow weed pressure, have vigorous seedling growth even at low temperatures, and have greater nutrient use efficiency in soils where macronutrient availability is limited due to mineralization of organic matter.  While resistance to insects and disease is important for all crops, it is especially important in organic systems as external inputs of crop protection chemicals are much less likely to be used.

Changes to plant architecture may also be advantageous for organic production methods. Genetic selection for increased root growth, root density, or rooting vigor may translate to heightened nutrient scavenging ability. Large spreading leaf canopies may allow certain crop varieties to reach above and shade weed competition.

Much modern plant breeding has been done with high inputs in centralized production environments that frequently have high quality soils with near optimum environmental conditions. Adapting crops to a particular climate or cropping system through genetic selection is an accepted concept. In fact, this is the means by which all of our crops have been developed from their wild ancestors by the farmers who domesticated them. Much of the modern breeding work done in the last fifty years has been done with high inputs in production environments that frequently have near optimum conditions.

Organic farms in many regions of the developed world tend to be smaller, more diversified operations than their commercial counterparts. The location of a considerable number of organic vegetable farms is not central to the large-scale production areas and consequently they often have more environmental variability in terms of climate, soil type and availability of irrigation water (Grube 2007). It follows that breeding for these diverse, heterogeneous environments may be best accomplished through the use of decentralized selection across a number of sites within a region (Ceccarelli and Grando 2007; Dawson et al. 2008). These sites should be representative of the environmental challenges with the lower inputs and environmental variability found on organic farms. Genetically elastic, heterogeneous crop varieties have proven to produce higher, more dependable yields in low input, subsistence agricultural systems than the more narrowly selected, genetically homozygous crop varieties of modern agriculture

By breeding under the challenges of environmental stresses in low input systems it is possible to breed genetically diverse, heterogeneous varieties with greater adaptive advantage to the environmental variables and cultural practices of organic farming. Adapting crops to a particular climate or cropping system through genetic selection is an accepted concept. In fact, this is the means by which all of our crops have been developed from their wild ancestors by the farmers who domesticated them.

Increasing the commercial availability of organic seed is an important first step in improving the sustainability of organic systems and reducing environmental impacts. However, developing crop genetic resources adapted to low input, diverse organic cropping systems is essential for the continued improvement of organic agriculture.

References and Citations
  • Ceccarelli, S. and S. Grando. 2007. Decentralized-participatory plant breeding: an example of demand driven research. Euphytica 155:349-360.
  • Dawson, J. C., K. Murphy, and S.S. Jones. 2008. Decentralized selection and participatory approaches in plant breeding for low-input systems. Euphytica. 160:143.
  • Grube, R. 2007. Breeding for organic and sustainable systems: One size does not fit all. HortScience 42:813.
  • OrganicNation.tv. 2009. What's so special about organic seed? [Online]. Fresh Cut Media. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPnVkvCsHOA (verified 11 Mar 2010).

 

 

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 3165

How to Implement and Verify Biodiversity Conservation Activities in Organic Agricultural Systems

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:49

This webinar took place on October 5, 2016. 

About the Webinar

Organic operations must follow the National Organic Program’s (NOP) regulations. The NOP Natural Resources and Biodiversity Conservation Guidance, which interprets these regulations, helps organic producers and their certification personnel determine which conservation practices are appropriate. Biodiversity conservation in organic agriculture varies in a continuum from simple to complex stewardship practices. Examples from Wild Farm Alliance that suggest compliance, and minor and major issues related to the Guidance, will be shared. This webinar will also feature presenter, Assistant Professor John Quinn, who will discuss components and issues around biodiversity. Organic producers will learn how to implement conservation practices, and certification personnel will become skilled on how to observe and verify organic operation’s biodiversity conservation practices.

Resources mentioned in the webinar:

About the Presenters

Jo Ann Baumgartner is the Executive Director of Wild Farm Alliance in Watsonville, California. A major focus of her work is on conservation education and advocacy in organic agriculture.

John Quinn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology, Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina. John's work focus on biodiversity conservation opportunities and benefits of these actions in agricultural ecosystems; focusing on organic and agroforestry systems.

System Requirements

View detailed system requirements here. Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 20056

Ecological Farm Design for Pest Management In Organic Vegetable Production: Successes and Challenges on Two Farms Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

About the Webinar

This webinar will describe the more than 20 year journeys of Pinnacle Farm, San Juan Bautista, CA and Biodesign Farm, Stevensville, MT. These farms increased plant diversity though practices such as planting insectaries and hedgerows, and employed reduced tillage, pest thresholds and crop planting timing to manage pests in vegetable crops with minimal or no spraying.

A pdf handout of the slides for this webinar can be found at http://create.extension.org/sites/default/files/Farm%20Design%20Pest%20Managment%20final.pdf

About the Presenters

Helen Atthowe has been farming on her own and consulting for other organic vegetable and fruit farms for 25 years. She was a horticulture extension agent for 15 years and owned and operated Biodesign Farm (30 acre diverse organic fruit and vegetable farm) in western Montana for 17 years. She recently spent 6 months as a consulting vegetable grower for a 2000 acre organic vegetable and fruit farm in northern Colorado with a 5000 member CSA.

Doug O'Brien currently owns and operates Doug O’Brien Agricultural Consulting, providing on-site technical advice, field monitoring, and research for clients involved in fresh produce growing, harvesting, cooling and marketing. He is an adjunct professor at Cabrillo College, in Santa Cruz, CA and teaches classes in organic farming. Previously, Doug was a co-owner of an organic produce brokerage company, a crop production manager, and an assistant farm advisor.

About eOrganic

eOrganic is the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at eXtension.org. Our website at http:www.extension.org/organic_production contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

To find all other upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars, go to http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Macintosh®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 7466

Why Eat Organic Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48
About the Webinar

As research into organic food and farming expands, trends are beginning to emerge validating the multiple benefits of organic systems. In this session, the author will present concise, understandable summaries of recently conducted research regarding nutrition, pesticide residues, biodiversity, natural resource conservation, soil and water quality, and food safety related to organic production and handling.

A handout for this webinar is available at http://create.extension.org/sites/default/files/WhyEatOrganicBW2012Handouts.pdf

To find out more about this conference, see http://www.specialtygrowers.org/iscaoc-conference.html

To view all other upcoming and archived eOrganic webinar and broadcast recordings, go to http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

About Jim Riddle

Jim Riddle has worked for over 26 years as an organic farmer, inspector, author, policy analyst and educator. He was founding chair of the International Organic Inspectors Association, (IOIA), and co-author of the IFOAM/IOIA International Organic Inspection Manual. He has trained hundreds of organic inspectors throughout the world. Jim served on the Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s Organic Advisory Task Force from 1991-2009, and was instrumental in passage of Minnesota’s landmark organic certification cost-share program. Since January 2006, Jim has worked as the University of Minnesota’s Organic Outreach Coordinator. Jim is former chair of the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board, and is a leading voice for organic agriculture.

About eOrganic

eOrganic is the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at eXtension.org. Our website at http:www.extension.org/organic_production contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.
 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 7467

Scouting for Vegetable and Fruit Pests on Organic Farms

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48


Resources Mentioned in the Webinar

Fruit Crop Pest Models - WSU Decision Aid System

Garden Insects of North America - W. Cranshaw

Natural Enemies Handbook - M.L Flint, S. Dreistadt

Northeast Vegetable and Strawberry Pest Identification Guide-University of Massachussetts

North Carolina State University: Insect and Related Pests of Vegetables

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook

Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Vegetable Production. Cornell University

Pests of the Garden and Small Farm, M.L. Flint

Pests of the West - W. Cranshaw

University of California IPM Online: Natural Enemies Gallery

USPEST.ORG IPM Pest and Plant Disease Models and Forecasting

About the Webinar

Crop consultant, Doug O’Brien, and organic farmer, Helen Atthowe, share their pest monitoring and decision making tips and short cuts. Learn how to look for insect, disease, and crop quality problems on organic vegetable and fruit farms. We will also touch on some ideas about how to maintain records that will help you better understand pest problems and what to do about them.

This webinar was funded by Western SARE project SW09-031: Bean Mold Management Tools and Rotational Systems Management.

Handout of the slides from this webinar

About the Presenters

Helen Atthowe has been farming on her own and consulting for other organic vegetable and fruit farms for 25 years. She was a horticulture extension agent for 15 years and owned and operated Biodesign Farm (30 acre diverse organic fruit and vegetable farm) in western Montana for 17 years. She recently spent 6 months as a consulting vegetable grower for a 2000 acre organic vegetable and fruit farm in northern Colorado with a 5000 member CSA.

Doug O'Brien currently owns and operates Doug O’Brien Agricultural Consulting, providing on-site technical advice, field monitoring, and research for clients involved in fresh produce growing, harvesting, cooling and marketing. He is an adjunct professor at Cabrillo College, in Santa Cruz, CA and teaches classes in organic farming. Previously, Doug was a co-owner of an organic produce brokerage company, a crop production manager, and an assistant farm advisor.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242 

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Linking Cover Crops, Plant Pathogens, and Disease Control in Organic Tomatoes

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

 

About the Webinar

Cover crops have many described uses, but choosing the right one for your
operation is not a simple matter. Management costs need to be compared to
their utility; e.g. for disease control. The results of field experiments
conducted in NY, OH, and MD evaluating different cover crops for tomato
production will be discussed.

Handout of the slides for this webinar (pdf)

Find all upcoming and archived webinars »

About the Presenter

Dr. Brian McSpadden Gardener works as plant pathologist and microbial ecologist at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, where he also directs the  the Organic Food Farming Education and Research program. His research focus on the influence of microorganisms on soil and plant health particularly in organic systems. Find his website at http://plantpath.osu.edu/mcspadden-gardener-lab/

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Organic Dairy Forages: Focus on Summer Annuals

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

About the Webinar

Summer annual forages--including millet, sorghums, sorghum-sudans, and teff-- can be important complements to pastures during the summer slump as well as harvested for stored feed.  Join Heather Darby and Rick Kersbergen as they discuss strategies for planting, harvesting, and feeding these forages to organic dairy cattle.

Funding for this webinar was provided by the Northeast Center for Risk Management Education and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

About the Presenters

Heather Darby is an agronomist at the University of Vermont Extension where she conducts applied research and outreach on farm-based fuel, forage, and grain production systems in New England. Heather's research has focused on traditional and niche crop variety trials, weed management strategies, and cropping systems development. Her farmer outreach programs have focused on soil health, nutrient management, organic grain and forage production, and oilseed production. In addition, Heather leads the eOrganic dairy team and also operates a certified organic farm with her husband in northern Vermont.

Rick Kersbergen is an Extension Professor at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension. Rick has been conducting research and extension programs related to sustainable dairy and forage systems since 1987. He is currently involved with several multi-state, applied research projects on cover crops, organic grains production, and forage and nutrient management. He is past chair of the Northeast Pasture Consortium and manages the regional website as a compendium of grazing information for the region.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Sourcing Organic Seed Just Got Easier: An Introduction to Organic Seed Finder

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

Find all eOrganic upcoming and archived webinars »

About the Presenters

Chet Boruff is the Chief Executive Officer of the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA). AOSCA provides seed certification and related services to the global seed industry, and it will manage the Organic Seed Finder.

Kristina Hubbard is the director of advocacy and communications for Organic Seed Alliance. She is facilitating the Organic Seed Finder project.

About eOrganic

eOrganic contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Tracking Your Produce For Your Business and Health Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

 

Slides from the webinar as a pdf file: http://create.extension.org/sites/default/files/Traceability%5B1%5D.pdf

Resources mentioned in the webinar:

Michigan State University Organic Farming Exchange: http://www.michiganorganic.msu.edu

Cornell University GAP course: http://www.gaps.cornell.edu/eventscalendar.html

Cornell publication: Food Safety Begins on the Farm: A Grower Self Assessment of Food Safety Risks: http://www.gaps.cornell.edu/documents/edumat/FSBFEngLOW.pdf

FAQs about the Food Safety Modernization Act http://sustainableagriculture.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/NSAC-Food-S...

FDA Guide to Minimize Food Safety Hazards for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformatio...

FDA Bad Bug Book: http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/CausesOfIllnessBadB...

Checklist used by USDA auditors: http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ams.fetchTemplateData.do?template=Templa...

Rodale Institute: Creating Lot Numbers: http://www.rodaleinstitute.org/course/M6/31
 

GAP certification agencies/auditing firms

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ams.fetchTemplateData.do?template=Templa... USDA GAP
http://www.primuslabs.com/cus/index.aspx Primus Labs
https://www.aibonline.org/ AIB
http://www.canadagap.ca/becoming-certified/getting-started/
http://www.nsf.org/business/nsf_agriculture/index.asp?program=NSFAgr NSF

About the Webinar

This session will explain simple steps an organic farm can take to reduce the risk on the farm while complying with the NOP organic certification. A computer-less traceability system will be discussed, and templates will be offered to aid the process. This session will help organic farmers improve the current level of food production safety and prepare for Food Production Safety Certification, such as the USDA GAP.

Colleen Collier Bess is recently retired from Michigan Department of Agriculture Pesticide and Plant Pest Management Division. She provided guidance for the Organic Cost Share for several years and then as USDA Good Ag Practices became a reality she was one of two USDA GAP inspectors conducting audits for the state of Michigan. She was the Program manager for fruit and vegetable inspection until she retired in December of 2010. Colleen is an educator and advocate for organic farmers and food safety, never shying from sharing her knowledge through outreach and educational programs throughout the state. Her knowledge on USDA GAP has helped many farmers reduce the risk on their farm by implementing Good Agricultural Practices and successfully passing a subsequent audit.

About eOrganic

eOrganic is the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at eXtension.org. Our website at http:www.extension.org/organic_production contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

View the eOrganic webinar schedule, and find recordings of all webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Macintosh®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Breeding and Genetics: Considerations for Organic Dairy Farms Webinar by eOrganic

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

This presentation took place on June 19, 2012.I n this webinar, Brad Heins of the University of Minnesota addressed breeding and genetic considerations on organic dairies, including an evaluation of breeds common to organic dairy farms (calving, production, components, and economic performance), the latest research on cross breeding, and considerations for your farm.

Handout of the slides for this webinar (pdf)

About the Presenter

Brad Heins is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Animal Science at the University of Minnesota, focusing on organic dairy production. Dr. Heins received his M.S. and Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. He worked with seven dairy farms (organic and conventional) in California that were crossbreeding, and followed the progress of cows, measuring their performance, health, and longevity. Currently, Dr. Heins conducts his research at the University of Minnesota’s West Central Research and Outreach Center (WCROC). The Center has a 100-head herd in a certified organic system, and a 130-head herd in a conventional grazing system. Besides Holsteins, WCROC has been crossbreeding cattle with Jersey, Swedish Red, Norwegian Red, Montbeliarde, Normande, and New Zealand Friesian. He also serves on the Minnesota Organic Advisory Task Force.

About eOrganic

eOrganic contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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The "Ancient" Grains Einkorn, Emmer, and Spelt: What We Know and What We Need to Find Out Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

 

About the webinar

This webinar was recorded on January 8, 2013. In this webinar, a team of researchers from the NIFA OREI project Value-added grains for local and regional food systems  discuss the so-called ancient grains--einkorn , emmer and spelt--including their origins and attributes, current and potential uses and markets, and what we know so far about how to grow them.  The team will also give an overview of the project's current work on developing best management practices for these grains, dehulling options, and identifying varieties and landraces with superior yield, flavor, or nutritional content. This webinar is for those interested in specialty grains, including farmers, consumers, bakers, chefs, millers, and other grain processors.

Handout of the slides for this webinar

About the Presenters

Frank Kutka studied plant breeding with Margaret Smith at Cornell University and currently serves as a co-coordinator of the Farm Breeding Club organized among members of the Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society. Kutka lives and breeds maize and other crops in western North Dakota.

Steve Zwinger is a crops researcher at the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center where he works with a diversity of crops adapted to Central North Dakota. Steve has trialed emmer and spelt for the past 20 years. Most recently he has been trialing einkorn along with emmer and spelt in organic fields.

Julie Dawson is a postdoctoral research associate at Cornell University working to develop varieties of wheat, spelt, emmer and einkorn for organic farming systems. Previously, she worked at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in France, with Dr. Isabelle Goldringer, where she contributed to the creation of a participatory plant breeding program led by an association of organic farmers, the Réseau Semences Paysannes (farmers' seed network). She received her PhD from Washington State University, working with Dr. Stephen Jones on organic and participatory wheat breeding.

June Russell is the Manger of Farm Inspections and Strategic Development for Greenmarket, GrowNYC. She has spent the last twenty years in numerous capacities within the food business from baker to chef to café and bar manager. Since 2007 she has spearheaded efforts to bring grains and local flour back in to the Northeast foodshed, through Greenmarket’s Regional Grains Project.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Starting Up Small-Scale Organic Hops Production

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48
About the Webinar

This program offers insight into small scale organic hops production to meet the growing demand by micro-breweries in the midwest and the potential to help diversify Michigan's organic production. This program covers: start up do’s and don’ts, up-front and ongoing costs, and market potential.

Handout of the slides as a pdf file

About the presenters

Rob Sirrine is a Community Food Systems educator for Michigan State University Extension in Leelenau County, located in the northwest lower peninsula of Michigan. Rob Areas of Emphasis include: Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture, Community Food Systems, Entrepreneurial Agriculture, Value-added Production, Sustainable Hops Production, and Organic Agriculture. In addition to work in Community Food Systems, Rob serves as the statewide lead for Michigan Hops Production. With increasing interest from Michigan micro-brewers and home-brewers, Rob has organized a series of educational sessions and on-farm field days for growers interested in hops production over the last three years. Moreover, he has been involved in several statewide and multi-state grant initiatives investigating the potential for sustainable hop production in the Great Lakes Region. In addition to offering educational programs on hop production Rob provides a leadership role with the Food Systems working group of the state MSUE team.

 

Brian Tennis and his wife Amy operate New Mission Organics, a farm located in Leelanau County, MI. They have been farming organically for the past 6 years. In addition to 5 acres of hops, they also grow organic sweet cherries as well. Brian and Amy are members of the Michigan Hop Alliance-a group of 5 organic hop growers in northwest Michigan that work together to pick, process, and package their hops for sale to micro and home-brewers.

 

About eOrganic

eOrganic is the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at eXtension.org. Our website at http:www.extension.org/organic_production contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

View the eOrganic webinar schedule, and find recordings of all webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

 

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Carolina Organic Commodities and Livestock Conference 2012: Selected Live Broadcasts

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

eOrganic brings you selected live broadcasts of presentations from the Carolina Organic Commodities and Livestock Conference which took place on January 12-13, 2012.

Updates from the NCSU Organic Cropping Systems Program and Growing Canola

Dr. Chris Reberg-Horton, North Carolina State University, provides project updates and discusses growing canola in North Carolina.

Increasing Soil Fertility and Health Through Cover Crops

Dr. Julie Grossman, North Carolina State University, covers soil biology and green manures, data on spring termination of cover crops, and nitrogen contribution of cover crops.

Organic Weed Management in Organic Grain Cropping Systems

Dr. Chris Reberg-Horton, North Carolina State University, discusses blind and between-row cultivation, seeding rate, fallow periods, crop rotation, variety selection, rolling, and more. He stresses the importance of large amounts of cover crop biomass for weed control.

Soil Fertility Management in Organic Grain Cropping Systems

Dr. John Spargo, University of Massachusetts, discusses organic approved forms of N, P, and K, and how they are best utilized in organic cropping systems.

Soil Fertility Management for Organic Wheat Production

Dr. John Spargo, University of Massachusetts, provides nitrogen recommendations for wheat grown in North Carolina and reviews research on fertility trials.

Wheat Mycotoxins in Organic Grain Systems

Dr. Christina Cowger, USDA-ARS and NCSU, reviews the life cycle and management of the pathogens that contribute to wheat mycotoxins.

Wheat Varietal Selection for Organic Farms in North Carolina

Dr. Chris Reberg-Horton, North Carolina State University introduces the different types of wheat for production in North Carolina and the results of some variety trials.

Find other upcoming and recorded eOrganic webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Developing an Organic System Plan for Row Crop Production Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

 

About the Webinar

This presentation, recorded on January 7, 2013, details how to develop an organic system plan for crop production to comply with the USDA National Organic Standard, with special attention to organic row crop production. The presenter will cover what must be included in organic system plan and the basic steps to organic certification.

Handout of the slides for this webinar

About the Presenter

Beth Rota has worked in sustainable agriculture as an organic inspector, certifier, educator, consultant and farm hand. Since 2007, Beth has worked for Quality Certification Services, a USDA accredited certifier based in Gainesville, Florida. She currently serves as an independent consultant for the University of Missouri. Beth received her M.S. in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana. Beth serves on the Board of Directors for the Community Garden Coalition, a non-profit serving community gardens and gardeners in Columbia, Missouri.

Find all upcoming and archived webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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OrganicA Project Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

About the Webinar

Presenters: Lorraine P. Berkett, Ph.D., Dept. of Plant & Soil Science, University of Vermont, OrganicA Project Coordinator and Researcher; and Terence L. Bradshaw, M.S., Dept. of Plant & Soil Science, University of Vermont, Orchard Manager and Researcher.

After extensive grower input, the multi-state, multi-disciplinary OrganicA Project was initiated in 2006 through a USDA OREI grant to holistically examine the opportunities and challenges of organic production within two major orchard systems growers are using to change to new cultivars and with five of the top apple cultivars that growers identified as important to the future of the industry in New England. Growers want to know what the potential is for sustainable and profitable organic production with the newer apple cultivars that are being planted in the region. The orchard systems are: (i) a new orchard planted with young trees purchased from a nursery and (ii) a “top-grafted” orchard, i.e., an established, older orchard onto which new cultivars are grafted. Research results will be presented.

See all eOrganic upcoming and archived webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

About eOrganic

eOrganic is the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at eXtension.org. Our website at http://www.extension.org/organic_production contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Macintosh®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Optimizing the Benefits of Hairy Vetch in Organic Production Webinar

ven, 2018/10/26 - 01:48

About the Webinar

The presenter will discuss optimizing and understanding the benefits of hairy vetch in organic production. The emphasis will be on the vegetable crop work of the Sustainable Agricultural Systems Lab in Beltsville, MD, but some information on roller-crimper management in grain crops will be included.

Slides from the webinar as a pdf are available here.

About the Presenter

John Teasdale is a retired Plant Physiologist from the USDA-ARS Sustainable Agricultural Systems Lab, Beltsville, MD, and currently conducts research as a Biological Sciences Collaborator with the same unit. His research has spanned many topics in sustainable agriculture including integrated weed management, cover crop management, and cropping system performance in long-term experiments.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242

About eOrganic

eOrganic is the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at eXtension.org. Our website at http:www.extension.org/organic_production contains articles, videos, and webinars for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture, published research results, farmer experiences, and certification. The content is collaboratively authored and reviewed by our community of University researchers and Extension personnel, agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

Air Date: February 28, 2012

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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