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Modifier eXtension Articles,News,Faqs,Events- organic production (anglais)

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Research in Organic Farming Systems

lun, 2016/03/28 - 21:40

CalCORE: Connecting California Farmers and Scientists to Improve Rotational Strawberry and Vegetable Systems

lun, 2016/03/28 - 21:24

 

Title: CalCORE: Connecting California Farmers and Scientists to Improve Rotational Strawberry and Vegetable Systems

 

Joji Muramoto:

When I started to do research and soil testing for farmers, when I saw they appreciated the data I provided, I realized, "Oh, I can do something for them." Doing something useful for farming...that has been my passion.

 

Diego Nieto:

In this region there is a very broad organic industry that includes both the large corporate growers and also the small-scale diversified growers. There are 49,000 acres of certified organic ground in two counties [Santa Cruz and Monterey] that is valued at close to $367 million. Seventy-five percent of the organic strawberries that are grown in California are grown in these two counties. So it is really a nice hot spot to do organic sustainable research in strawberry.

 

Chapter Title: Goal 1: Building the CalCORE Network

 

Carol Shennan:

The acronym CalCORE stands for California Collaborative Organic Research and Extension network. We have now, I think, more than 15 growers involved in one way or another with the network, plus many extension agents, and local organizations and industry people, as well as researchers from half a dozen different places.

 

Tim Campion:

It has been a great collaboration. We pick up new information from them and they are always well organized and informative.

 

Steve Pedersen:

I think the community elements of the CalCORE trial has been one of the major benefits for me. Some really good nuggets of information you’ll pick up just standing on the sidelines and talking to people. And also being introduced to all the different researchers has been really valuable.

 

Carol Shennan:

We have made a special effort to try and involve the Spanish-speaking  farming community in the project by working with the organization ALBA, The Agricultural Land Based Association, who work to help farmworkers become organic farmers.

 

Nathan Harkleroad:

It has been really important to do outreach to the Latino communities because so many Latinos are owners and operators of farms in our region, and particularly strawberries.

 

 

Chapter Title: Goal 2: Researching Integrated Systems to Manage Fertility, Disease and Pests

 

Carol Shennan:

The main research goal is to look at developing rotation systems that are both economic but also have a smaller environmental footprint as possible. Where we try to address issues of pests, and diseases and nutrients all in the same rotations, and that is really what the core of calCORE is.

 

There are a number of specific questions we are trying to ask. The first one is about length of rotation: How often can you grow strawberries? And, how does the particular crops you grow in rotation affect the health of the strawberries? Particularly in terms of disease management, because that is the main limitation for organic strawberries in many cases, is soilborne diseases

 

Steve Pedersen:

Our strawberries are by far our largest earning crop per acre, so most of our crop planning is centered around setting things up for a good strawberry crop.  We have to be really careful in our rotations choosing where to grow things; a lot of the vegetables that we grow turn out to be hosts for verticillium in particular.

 

Carol Shennan:

The secondary goal is to look at the use of anaerobic soil disinfestation or the addition of mustard seed meals as strategies for controlling disease. Each of those affects fertility, so we are also doing a lot of measurements of soil fertility. We are also interested in the biological control of important pests.

 

We ended up with quite a complicated study. One of the ways we've tried to cope with that and still get realistic information from the farms is that we are using something that is called a mother-baby design, where we have a big mother experiment where we do all the replications. And then the growers in the group decided on a subset of those treatments to test on their own farms, and those are the baby trials which we now have on 6 different farms.

 

Jaime Lopez:

CalCORE has really helped us with learning more about new processes or better practices for organics. It has helped us in grounds where we do have high amounts of soil diseases, and it has helped us to suppress those soil diseases to have a better production.

 

Rigoberto Bucio:

Now with this project for which I was fortunate enough to be invited, I have learned it is necessary to do soil analysis, and to carry things out in an orderly way. I learned that sometimes if we don’t do soil analysis, we unknowingly apply too much fertilizer.

 

Steve Pedersen:

There are some pretty major benefits. And one of those, and it has been reinforced by the CalCORE experiments, is the importance of using broccoli as a rotational crop for strawberries, which is something we do pretty much across the board now. And getting introduced to the concept of ASD, anaerobic soil disinfestation, is another one and I think that shows great promise.

 

Carol Shennan:

You really have to have the perspective of the farmers because they know their systems in ways that as a researcher I can never know. I can get really excited about some basic science questions, don’t get me wrong, but my real passion is how can we use scientific knowledge to help improve the productivity, ecology  and the human dimensions of our agricultural systems.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 15423

Exclusion of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug with Selective Screening for Organic Production

jeu, 2016/03/10 - 16:02

eOrganic authors:

Ricardo Bessin, University of Kentucky

Rachelyn Dobson, University of Kentucky

Jennifer L.C. Moore, University of Tennessee

Mary Rogers, University of Minnesota

Introduction

Since its introduction into Allentown, PA in the mid-1990s, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), has spread rapidly across the United States and parts of Canada. As BMSB populations increase, it transitions from being only a household nuisance pest to an agricultural pest that causes substantial yield losses in outbreak years. Both BMSB adults and nymphs have piercing-sucking mouthparts and feed on a wide range of crops including fruits, vegetables, soybeans, cotton, field corn, ornamentals, and nursery plants. Early-season damage to fruits and vegetables such as apples, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants may cause premature fruit drop. Later in the season, feeding can result in visible external and internal scarring, reducing the percentage of marketable fruit. In some instances, losses can approach 100% on sweet corn, tomatoes, apples, and peppers. The most severe losses have occurred in the Mid-Atlantic states where BMSB has been established since the mid-1990s. Native species of stink bugs cause similar damage as BMSB, and management strategies developed for BMSB should also help reduce crop damage caused by native stink bugs.

Figure 1. BMSB is a serious pest of many high-value horticultural crops. Photo credit: Ricardo Bessin, University of Kentucky.

Figure 2. Stink bug damage to tomatoes and peppers results in discolored blemishes that are corky under the skin. Photo credit: Ricardo Bessin, University of Kentucky.

National Organic Program (NOP)-compliant insecticides have provided limited control of BMSB and are less effective than conventional sprays. Organic producers need to use an integrated program including cultural control, biological control, and physical methods to manage BMSB. Organic control tactics currently being explored include use of insectary plantings to increase natural enemies, trap crops to intercept BMSB before they colonize cash crops, and biological control. This fact sheet focuses on the use of selective mesh screens to physically exclude BMSB and native stink bugs from high value organically-produced crops.

Row Covers

Spun-bond row covers have been used by producers for many years for frost protection in the spring or fall and to exclude insect pests from crops—particularly when plants are small and less tolerant to feeding damage. Drawbacks of row covers include exclusion of pollinators and natural enemies of pests, susceptibility to damage by high winds, reduced light transmission, increasing temperatures in summer months, and costs of materials with limited life spans. Ideally, row covers should allow for good air circulation and light penetration as well as some movement of natural predators through the mesh to prevent secondary pest outbreaks under the screens.

Research studies

Studies conducted on organically-managed farms at the Universities of Kentucky and Tennessee evaluated selective screening to exclude BMSB. Barrier screens with 1/6, 1/8, and 1/25 inch mesh size openings (see Sources of Netting below) were draped over frames and secured to the ground. Previous studies have shown that mesh sizes with openings larger than 1/6 inch do not exclude BMSB adults, and finer meshes are needed to exclude nymphs.

Low numbers of BMSB were present in Kentucky, while high numbers were present in Tennessee during these studies. In both states, the number of natural enemies on plants inside the 1/6 and 1/8 inch mesh screens were comparable to plants without exclusionary netting, while numbers were significantly reduced under the 1/25 inch netting. In Kentucky, outbreaks of aphids under 1/25 inch mesh suggests a higher risk of secondary pests under these fine-mesh screens due to the exclusion of natural enemies. In Tennessee, where BMSB numbers were higher than in Kentucky, the 1/25 inch mesh plots produced the greatest marketable yield, both due to the greater exclusion of pests and protection from sunscald. In Kentucky where BMSB numbers were low, there was no difference in marketable yield among the types of netting, all of which were superior to unprotected plants. In areas with higher BMSB pressure, finer meshes (1/25 inch) may provide greater exclusion of high stink bug populations and protection of fruit from sunscald.

brown marmorated stink bug

Figure 3. By selecting the proper sized netting, BMSB can be excluded while natural enemies are allowed to pass through. Photo credit: Ricardo Bessin, University of Kentucky.

Table 1. Summary of stink bug numbers, damage, fruit marketability, and sunscald of ‘Aristotle’ peppers harvested from screened plots and unscreened control plots at the UK Horticulture Research Farm and the UT Organic Crops Unit in 2013 and 2014.

Screen type

Beneficial insects (TN)

BMSB adults and nymphs (TN)

% stink bug damage (KY)

% stink bug damage (TN)

% marketable yield (KY)

% marketable yield (TN)

Peppers with sunscald (KY)

No Screen

66 a

0.53 a

6.6 a

22.5 a

66.2 b

45.9 b

8.0 a

1/6” openings

58 b

0.10 b

  2.1 bc

18.0 ab

75.0 a

55.7 b

0.9 b

1/8” openings

  67 ab

0.10 b

  4.3 ab

20.6 a

76.6 a

55.0 b

2.4 b

1/25” openings

39 c

0.08 b

0.6 c

11.6 b

78.2 a

68.9 a

8.0 a

Means within a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different.Means within a column followed by different letters are significantly different.

Sources of Netting

Note: These sources are provided as examples and do not imply endorsement of any product or supplier.

  • Black 1/6 inch mesh netting: Industrial Netting, Minneapolis, MN.
  • Black 1/8 inch mesh netting: Industrial Netting, Minneapolis, MN.
  • White 1/25 inch fine mesh 30% shade cloth netting: Insect Screen, Greenhouse MegaStore, Danville, IL.


 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16798

Growing the eOrganic Community: Annual Report 2015

jeu, 2016/03/03 - 18:23

Contents

eOrganic Annual Report 2015

eOrganic completed its seventh year in 2015 as the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at http://www.extension.org. Our goals are to engage farmers, agricultural professionals, and other members of the organic agriculture community with timely and relevant science-, experience-, and regulation-based information in a variety of formats; and to foster a national organic research and outreach community. Through articles, videos, webinars and conference broadcasts, we make organic research available to the public.

More than 300 eOrganic members and collaborators have actively contributed to eOrganic by authoring and/or reviewing articles, producing or reviewing videos, answering Ask an Expert questions, presenting webinars, or attending outreach and leadership events. Read about our accomplishments in 2015 and our upcoming plans for the 2016 season.

Outreach to Farmers and Agricultural Information Providers

To help spread the word about eOrganic and the resources we provide, we had booths at several large organic farmer events in 2015, including the EcoFarm Conference in Pacific Grove, California, the MOSES conference in La Crosse, Wisconsin, the Organicology Conference in Portland, Oregon, and the Small Farms Conference at Oregon State University. We sincerely thank all of our volunteers, including Helen Atthowe, Carl Rosato, Ingrid West, and Mike Hass, for their help in staffing eOrganic exhibits.

To keep researchers, educators, service providers, and farmers aware of our resources, including our webinars, we publish eOrganic Updates. More than 12,000 people received these notices in 2015. In addition, eOrganic maintains an active presence on social media sites such as Facebook, where we have 3,930 likes; and Twitter, where we have 2,948 followers. We also publish a bi-monthly newsletter that reaches over 12,000 subscribers. In 2015, eOrganic pages at extension.org attracted over 642,000 page views (of over 2 million total views). Our YouTube channel attracted over 390,000 views, leading it to surpass 2.2 million total views.

eOrganic Webinars and Conference Broadcasts

Since December of 2009, we've offered our popular winter webinar series, attended by farmers, Extension educators, researchers, organic inspectors and certifiers, Master Gardeners, and agriculture professionals. These webinars, which contain information on the latest organic research and practical farming techniques, allow people from all over the world to hear a presentation, view the presentation slides, and type in questions—all without having to leave their farms or travel to conferences. Presentations are recorded and made available for viewing at any time from eOrganic's YouTube channel. To date, eOrganic has delivered more than 150 webinars attended by over 18,000 attendees, of which, on average, 30% were farmers. In addition, eOrganic broadcasts selected presentations from national organic conferences live online and archives the presentations on YouTube.

The 2015 season featured live presentations from the Organic Agriculture Research Symposium and Organicology conferences, as well as 19 webinars on diverse topics such as insect and disease management, ancient and heritage wheat varieties, compost tea, weed management, variety trials, extreme weather challenges, and native bee pollinators. Many of the webinars were based on new research from USDA NIFA Organic Research and Extension Initiative and Organic Transitions Program projects. We have many more webinars scheduled for 2016. You can find all eOrganic upcoming and archived webinars and live broadcasts at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242.

Highlights of the 2015 Webinar and Broadcast Season Webinar Evaluation

In 2015, 2,775 people attended eOrganic webinars and live conference broadcasts. Across all webinars, 49% responded to post-webinar evaluation surveys. Of these, approximately 30% were farmers, 8% were Extension personnel, 8% were researchers, 5% were from nonprofits, 10% were agriculture professionals, 11% worked for government agencies, and 5% were organic inspectors or certifiers. Survey respondents' geographic affiliations were: 29% Northeast, 22% Central, 12% South, 21% West, and 16% other named regions or countries. Across all webinars, 75% said the webinars significantly or moderately improved their understanding of the topic, 22% said "a little improved" and 3% said "not improved". 75% of respondents planned to apply the knowledge they gained in the webinars a lot or somewhat, 20% said "a little" and 5% said "not at all". 81% said the technical level of the webinars was "just right", 7% thought they were too technical, and 12% thought they were too basic. 78% would recommend the webinars to others, 18% might recommend them, and 4% would not. 96% of respondents thought access to the webinars was easy, 2% said it was somewhat difficult, and less than 1% said access was very difficult.

Webinar feedback in 2015:
  • "Great presentation. Looking forward to future webinars particularly on insect pests and management. Thanks to eOrganic for providing an effective information delivery system between scientists/educators and end-users."
  • "The webinar was very helpful. Alex (Lyon) did a fantastic job. Thanks for all the work eOrganic does to bring organic research to a wider audience. This is such a fantastic resource for the organic community."
  • "No doubt these are among the most knowledgeable people in the country on the subject and the research they presented is very current and relevant."
  • "The discussion about the different pests and the different crops was helpful. Also, finally somebody is listening to the farmers!"
Online Courses

The eOrganic Dairy Team continues to offer its asynchronous online course, "An Introduction to Organic Dairy Production" as part of "Development of Technical Training and Support for Agricultural Service Providers and Farmers in Certified Organic Dairy Production Systems" USDA NIFA Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative (OREI) project. Course developers and instructors included: Cindy Daley and Audrey Denney, California State University-Chico; Heather Darby and Deb Heleba, University of Vermont Extension; Sarah Flack, Sarah Flack Consulting; Sid Bosworth, University of Vermont; and Karen Hoffman, USDA NRCS. The course is composed of 10 modules addressing a range of topics related to certified organic dairy production, including certification, soil health, pasture and forages, herd health and nutrition, milk quality, and calf management. Each module has required readings, a narrated PowerPoint presentation from an expert on the topic, and recommended additional resources. CCA CEUs are available. In 2015, seven farmers and service providers participated in the course. Find a full description and a link to the course at http://www.extension.org/pages/69299.

In 2015, the eOrganic dairy team, led by Cindy Daley and Heather Darby, worked to develop a second online course. "On the Ground: A Closer Look at Organic Dairy Pasture, Forages, and Soils" is a self-directed online course designed for Extension educators and other agriculture service providers, as well as farmers and students who want to move beyond the basics and better understand how healthy soils lead to healthy livestock feeds. It is a follow up to "An Introduction to Organic Dairy Production", which is a prerequisite for taking this course. 

eOrganic is currently recruiting service providers and farmers to beta test the course; please contact Debra Heleba at debra.heleba@uvm.edu

eOrganic also continues to offer the Organic Seed Production course, in which approximately 275 people have enrolled. The course consists of a set of tutorials covering the fundamentals of seed production for onions, beets and chard, brassicas, carrots, and wet-seeded crops, as well as climatic requirements for seed crops, important diseases, and seed quality. Find more information on this free course here

eOrganic Articles

All eOrganic articles can be found at www.extension.org/organic_production. Before publication, every article is subject to two anonymous peer reviews and National Organic Program compliance review.

eOrganic published the following articles in 2015: Farm System Descriptions

In 2015, eOrganic published a data-rich Farm System Description of Woodleaf Farm in Oroville, California as part of a WSARE Project led by Alex Stone of Oregon State University: "Integrating Research and Practice in Systems Management of Organic Farms". The project focuses on long-term organic farms that have kept detailed records on soil and nutrient management, pest management, and disease management, and examines the outcomes of their farm management strategies. Additional farm system descriptions will be published in 2016.

Our 5 most popular articles in 2015 were:

Videos

eOrganic posted transcripts and links to the following videos in 2015:

The eOrganic YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/eOrganic houses eOrganic's 534 videos. The channel has over 5,300 subscribers and over 2.2 million views. Our most popular videos in 2015 were:

Organic Farming Research Websites

eOrganic is currently working with 24 USDA NIFA funded research and outreach projects. eOrganic supports these groups in diverse ways, including technical support for the development of articles and videos, peer-refereed and NOP-compliance review, video production training and editing, web conferencing, conference broadcasting, workspaces for project management, and public websites. For some of these projects, eOrganic hosts public websites where you can learn about the project goals and personnel, and find results and reports as they become available.

In 2015, new materials including farmer profiles and a business planning guide on organic transition were posted to the Tools for Transition Project website, and new fact sheets were posted to the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug website. The Organic Agriculture Research Symposium website contains proceedings and links to recorded presentations from the conference in 2015, and new recordings from the 2016 conference will be available soon.

eOrganic also hosts the following special websites: an organic variety trial database to which users can upload trial reports, which was created with the NOVIC project, and the Organic Seed Alliance, and a gallery of colorful and nutritious organic carrot varieties in development for the Carrot Improvement for Organic Agriculture project. If you have trial results to share and are interested in participating in the Organic Variety Trial Database, please contact Jared Zystro of the Organic Seed Alliance.

Ask an Expert

Ask an Expert is a free service that anyone can use to get answers to questions from Land Grant University (LGU) and Extension professionals through eXtension.org. Ask your question at https://ask.extension.org/groups/1668/ask—you can even submit an image to help with a diagnosis.

eOrganic provides oversight of all questions tagged with "organic production" within the Ask-an-Expert system. Our staff finds an answer by either answering the question directly or by soliciting the best possible response from our eOrganic members. In 2015, community members answered approximately 57 questions. Almost 1,300 organic agriculture questions have been answered through the service since its inception. We encourage you to use this free and underutilized service for answers to your organic farming questions. Find it at https://ask.extension.org/groups/1668/ask

Get involved with eOrganic

eOrganic is a Community of Practice, which means it relies on community members like you to help it grow and better serve our farmer and agricultural professional stakeholders by developing and delivering critical and timely resources. If you are a researcher or Extension educator with expertise in organic agriculture, eOrganic wants you to write an article, shoot a video, deliver a webinar, or develop and teach an online course. All of our articles and videos undergo NOP-compliance and peer review before publication. For more information on how to get involved with eOrganic, join eOrganic at http://eorganic.info or contact Alice Formiga at alice.formiga@hort.oregonstate.edu.

Write eOrganic into Your Next Grant Proposal

For complete information on the diverse opportunities eOrganic offers project groups and how to write eOrganic into your proposal, visit http://eOrganic.info/proposal. During the past year, eOrganic received subawards from 20 ongoing OREI and ORG projects. We can also partner with you on regional IPM, AFRI, SARE, NRCS-CIG and proposals from other funding sources. A 2-page handout describing our services to funded projects, which can be distributed at meetings, can be found here.

eOrganic can offer your project:

  • Web conferencing with the option of online or toll-free phone audio
  • Webinars and webinar series to stakeholders and the public
  • eXtension publication editing, and peer and NOP-compliance review
  • Video training, editing, review, and posting to the web
  • Online course development and support
  • Outreach for your publications, videos, webinars and websites to our established network of 9,000 farmers, extension personnel, agricultural professionals, and researchers from around the country and the globe—at conferences and through our newsletters and social networking activities
  • Ask an Expert support
  • Project workspace at eOrganic.info to facilitate project communication and management
  • Project websites that are easily managed by your project members from eOrganic.info (see http://eorganic.info/novic)
  • Analytics information for reporting on your articles, videos, webinars and courses. Evaluation for webinars and conference broadcasts.
Stay in touch!

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This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 17153

Approved Chemicals for Use in Organic Postharvest Systems

jeu, 2016/03/03 - 13:05

Source:

Adapted from: Silva, E. 2008. Approved chemicals for use in organic postharvest systems. In Wholesale success: a farmer's guide to selling, postharvest handling, and packing produce (Midwest edition). Available online at: http://www.familyfarmed.org/wholesale-success/ (verified 6 Dec 2011).

Introduction: Postharvest Handling and the National Organic Program

The USDA has established a National Organic Program (NOP) Rule to set and enforce uniform standards for both producing and handling agricultural and processed food products labeled as organic. Chemicals used in organic postharvest operations must comply with the NOP rules.  Most synthetic inputs are prohibited; those that are allowed may be used only with restrictions. For more information, see the related articles National Organic Program: What Agricultural Professionals Need to Know and Can I Use This Input on my Organic Farm?

Sanitation and Disinfection

Adequate sanitation and disinfection during postharvest processes are vital components of a postharvest management plan. As food safety regulations become increasingly important to the sales and marketing of crops, the establishment of proper measures to ensure the elimination of food-borne pathogens is essential. In addition to mitigating potential food-borne illness, proper sanitation during postharvest handling can also minimize the occurrence of postharvest disease and decay. As is the case during the production stage of the crop, all products used during the postharvest period must adhere to NOP regulations.

Chlorine

Chlorine is a very common disinfectant that can be added to transport flumes or to produce cooling or wash water. Liquid sodium hypochlorite is typically used, with the pH of the water maintained between 6.5 and 7.5 to optimize effectiveness (Suslow, undated). The NOP approves chlorine’s use (calcium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and sodium hypochlorite) in postharvest management as an algicide, disinfectant, and sanitizer. These regulations restrict the residual chlorine levels in the water at the discharge or effluent point to the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act, currently established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at 4 mg/L (ppm) for chlorine. However, the levels of chlorine used to prepare water to be used for sanitation of tools, equipment, product, or food contact surfaces may be higher than 4 mg/L and should be in high enough concentration to control microbial contaminants. Thus, the concentration of chlorine at the beginning of a disinfection treatment is generally greater than 4 mg/L; however, care must be taken to ensure that the effluent water does not exceed this limit. For more information, read the NOP's Guidance, "The Use of Chlorine Materials in Organic Produciton and Handling." 

Chlorine can exist in water in various forms. Free chlorine may be found as hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ion, with the hypochlorous acid form providing the strongest antimicrobial properties. At a pH of 6.5, 95% of the chlorine is in the hypochlorous form; maintaining the water pH at this range provides the greatest disinfecting power. Chlorine may become bound to soil, debris, and other organic matter in the water; once chlorine becomes combined with these materials, it is no longer available for disinfection. In order to maximize the effectiveness of any chlorine treatment, it is beneficial to perform additional cleaning steps to produce arriving from the field. This may include a vigorous prewash with brushes or sponges to remove excess debris from the produce, or a clear water rinse to remove soil and other debris, prior to using the sanitizer solution. Also, cleaning out dump tanks and residue screens will help minimize the presence of soil and debris and maximize chlorine’s effectiveness.

Ozone

Ozone is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to chlorine for water disinfection. Ozone, through its action as an oxidizer, provides comparable disinfection power to chlorine, rapidly attacks bacterial cell walls and thick-walled spores of plant pathogens. Ozone treatments have the benefit of forming fewer undesirable by-products than chlorine treatments, such as trihalomethane, chloroform, and other dangerous compounds. Ozone is faster acting than chlorine and allows for adequate disinfection with short-term contact to the produce. The use of ozone does require a greater capital investment and ongoing operating costs than the use of chlorine, however. Because of the instability of the compound (20 min in clean water), ozone must be generated on-site, requiring investment in ozone-generating equipment. These generators create ozone through the action of a high energy source (UV light or corona discharge), splitting oxygen molecules that then recombine to form ozone. Small-scale ozone generating units are available for a few thousand dollars.

Peroxyacetic acid

Peroxyacetic acid (PAA, also called peracetic acid on the NOP National List), in combination with hydrogen peroxide, is another popular alternative to chlorine that is allowed in organic production. Like chlorine, PAA performs well in water dump tanks and water flumes. Like ozone, PAA treatments result in safer byproducts than chlorine treatments. The disinfection performance of PAA is comparable to chlorine and ozone. To maximize effectiveness, PAA should be maintained at a level of 80 ppm in the wash water. A post-treatment wash with potable water may be recommended after a disinfection treatment with PAA. Though not a requirement of the National Organic Standards themselves, all allowed inputs must follow label use instructions when used in organic production. Therefore, if the PAA label recommends a fresh water rinse after use, then this rinse should be done.

Other Allowed Cleaners and Sanitizers (Suslow, 2000).
  • Acetic acid. Allowed as a cleanser or sanitizer. Vinegar used as an ingredient must be from an organic source.
  • Alcohol, Ethyl. Allowed as a disinfectant. To be used as an ingredient, the alcohol must be from an organic source.
  • Alcohol, Isopropyl. May be used as a disinfectant under restricted conditions.
  • Ammonium sanitizers.  Quaternary ammonium salts are a general example in this category. Quaternary ammonium may be used on non-food contact surfaces. It may not be used in direct contact with organic foods. Its use is prohibited on food contact surfaces, except for specific equipment where alternative sanitizers significantly increase equipment corrosion. Detergent cleaning and rinsing procedures, often combined with product purges prior to organic production, must follow quaternary ammonium application. Monitoring must show no detectable residue prior to the start of organic processing or packaging (example: fresh cut salads).
  • Bleach. Calcium hypochlorite, sodium hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide are allowed as a sanitizer for water and food contact surfaces. Product (fresh produce) wash water treated with chlorine compounds as a disinfectant cannot exceed 4ppm (mg/L) residual chlorine measured downstream of product contact.
  • Detergents. Allowed as equipment cleaners. Also includes surfactants and wetting agents. All products must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
  • Hydrogen peroxide. Allowed as a water and surface disinfectant.
  • Ozone. Considered GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) for produce and equipment disinfection. Exposure limits for worker safety apply.
  • Peroxyacetic acid. Water and fruit and vegetable surface disinfectant.
  • Carbon dioxide. Permitted for postharvest use in modified and controlled atmosphere storage and packaging. For crops that tolerate treatment with elevated CO2 (≥?15%), suppression of decay and control of insect pests can be achieved.
  • Wax. Must not contain any prohibited synthetic substances. Acceptable sources include carnuba or wood resin waxes.
  • Ethylene.  Allowed for postharvest ripening of tropical fruit and degreening of citrus.
References and Citations
  • Suslow, T.V..  1998. Basics of ozone applications for postharvest treatment of vegetables [Online]. Perishables Handling Quarterly Issue No. 94. Postharvest Information Research and Information Center, University of California at Davis. Available at: http://ucanr.edu/datastoreFiles/234-198.pdf (Scroll down.)(verified 3 March 2010).
  • Suslow, T.V.. 2000.  Postharvest handling for organic crops.  Organic Vegetable Production in California Series. Pub. 7254. University of California Davis. Available at: http://ucanr.org/freepubs/docs/7254.pdf (verified 3 March 2010). Editor's note: this was written in 2000 and some of the information is no longer accurate. Check with your certifier before using any product.
Additional Resources
  • Graham, D. M. 1997. Use of ozone for food processing. Food Technology. 51: 72-75
  • Richardson, S.D., A.D. Thruston, T.V. Caughran, T.W. Collette, K.S. Patterson, and B.W. Lykins. 1998. Chemical byproducts of chlorine and alternative disinfectants. Food Technology 52: 58-61.

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 2669

Growing the eOrganic Community: Annual Report 2015

mar, 2016/03/01 - 15:40

Contents

eOrganic Annual Report 2015

eOrganic completed its seventh year in 2015 as the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at http://www.extension.org. Our goals are to engage farmers, agricultural professionals, and other members of the organic agriculture community with timely and relevant science-, experience-, and regulation-based information in a variety of formats; and to foster a national organic research and outreach community. Through articles, videos, webinars and conference broadcasts, we make organic research available to the public.

More than 300 eOrganic members and collaborators have actively contributed to eOrganic by authoring and/or reviewing articles, producing or reviewing videos, answering Ask an Expert questions, presenting webinars, or attending outreach and leadership events. Read about our accomplishments in 2015 and our upcoming plans for the 2016 season.

Outreach to Farmers and Agricultural Information Providers

To help spread the word about eOrganic and the resources we provide, we had booths at several large organic farmer events in 2015, including the EcoFarm Conference in Pacific Grove, California, the MOSES conference in La Crosse, Wisconsin, the Organicology Conference in Portland, Oregon, and the Small Farms Conference at Oregon State University. We sincerely thank all of our volunteers, including Helen Atthowe, Carl Rosato, Ingrid West, and Mike Hass, for their help in staffing eOrganic exhibits.

To keep researchers, educators, service providers, and farmers aware of our resources, including our webinars, we publish eOrganic Updates. More than 12,000 people received these notices in 2015. In addition, eOrganic maintains an active presence on social media sites such as Facebook, where we have 3,930 likes; and Twitter, where we have 2,948 followers. We also publish a bi-monthly newsletter that reaches over 12,000 subscribers. In 2015, eOrganic pages at extension.org attracted over 642,000 page views (of over 2 million total views). Our YouTube channel attracted over 390,000 views, leading it to surpass 2.2 million total views.

eOrganic Webinars and Conference Broadcasts

Since December of 2009, we've offered our popular winter webinar series, attended by farmers, Extension educators, researchers, organic inspectors and certifiers, Master Gardeners, and agriculture professionals. These webinars, which contain information on the latest organic research and practical farming techniques, allow people from all over the world to hear a presentation, view the presentation slides, and type in questions—all without having to leave their farms or travel to conferences. Presentations are recorded and made available for viewing at any time from eOrganic's YouTube channel. To date, eOrganic has delivered more than 150 webinars attended by over 18,000 attendees, of which, on average, 30% were farmers. In addition, eOrganic broadcasts selected presentations from national organic conferences live online and archives the presentations on YouTube.

The 2015 season featured live presentations from the Organic Agriculture Research Symposium and Organicology conferences, as well as 19 webinars on diverse topics such as insect and disease management, ancient and heritage wheat varieties, compost tea, weed management, variety trials, extreme weather challenges, and native bee pollinators. Many of the webinars were based on new research from USDA NIFA Organic Research and Extension Initiative and Organic Transitions Program projects. We have many more webinars scheduled for 2016. You can find all eOrganic upcoming and archived webinars and live broadcasts at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242.

Highlights of the 2015 Webinar and Broadcast Season Webinar Evaluation

In 2015, 2,775 people attended eOrganic webinars and live conference broadcasts. Across all webinars, 49% responded to post-webinar evaluation surveys. Of these, approximately 30% were farmers, 8% were Extension personnel, 8% were researchers, 5% were from nonprofits, 10% were agriculture professionals, 11% worked for government agencies, and 5% were organic inspectors or certifiers. Survey respondents' geographic affiliations were: 29% Northeast, 22% Central, 12% South, 21% West, and 16% other named regions or countries. Across all webinars, 75% said the webinars significantly or moderately improved their understanding of the topic, 22% said "a little improved" and 3% said "not improved". 75% of respondents planned to apply the knowledge they gained in the webinars a lot or somewhat, 20% said "a little" and 5% said "not at all". 81% said the technical level of the webinars was "just right", 7% thought they were too technical, and 12% thought they were too basic. 78% would recommend the webinars to others, 18% might recommend them, and 4% would not. 96% of respondents thought access to the webinars was easy, 2% said it was somewhat difficult, and less than 1% said access was very difficult.

Webinar feedback in 2015:
  • "Great presentation. Looking forward to future webinars particularly on insect pests and management. Thanks to eOrganic for providing an effective information delivery system between scientists/educators and end-users."
  • "The webinar was very helpful. Alex (Lyon) did a fantastic job. Thanks for all the work eOrganic does to bring organic research to a wider audience. This is such a fantastic resource for the organic community."
  • "No doubt these are among the most knowledgeable people in the country on the subject and the research they presented is very current and relevant."
  • "The discussion about the different pests and the different crops was helpful. Also, finally somebody is listening to the farmers!"
Online Courses

The eOrganic Dairy Team continues to offer its asynchronous online course, "An Introduction to Organic Dairy Production" as part of "Development of Technical Training and Support for Agricultural Service Providers and Farmers in Certified Organic Dairy Production Systems" USDA NIFA Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative (OREI) project. Course developers and instructors included: Cindy Daley and Audrey Denney, California State University-Chico; Heather Darby and Deb Heleba, University of Vermont Extension; Sarah Flack, Sarah Flack Consulting; Sid Bosworth, University of Vermont; and Karen Hoffman, USDA NRCS. The course is composed of 10 modules addressing a range of topics related to certified organic dairy production, including certification, soil health, pasture and forages, herd health and nutrition, milk quality, and calf management. Each module has required readings, a narrated PowerPoint presentation from an expert on the topic, and recommended additional resources. CCA CEUs are available. In 2015, seven farmers and service providers participated in the course. Find a full description and a link to the course at http://www.extension.org/pages/69299.

In 2015, the eOrganic dairy team, led by Cindy Daley and Heather Darby, worked to develop a second online course. "On the Ground: A Closer Look at Organic Dairy Pasture, Forages, and Soils" is a self-directed online course designed for Extension educators and other agriculture service providers, as well as farmers and students who want to move beyond the basics and better understand how healthy soils lead to healthy livestock feeds. It is a follow up to "An Introduction to Organic Dairy Production", which is a prerequisite for taking this course. 

eOrganic is currently recruiting service providers and farmers to beta test the course; please contact Debra Heleba at debra.heleba@uvm.edu

eOrganic also continues to offer the Organic Seed Production course, in which approximately 275 people have enrolled. The course consists of a set of tutorials covering the fundamentals of seed production for onions, beets and chard, brassicas, carrots, and wet-seeded crops, as well as climatic requirements for seed crops, important diseases, and seed quality. Find this free course on the eXtension Moodle campus site at http://campus.extension.org/enrol/index.php?id=377.

eOrganic Articles

All eOrganic articles can be found at www.extension.org/organic_production. Before publication, every article is subject to two anonymous peer reviews and National Organic Program compliance review.

eOrganic published the following articles in 2015: Farm System Descriptions

In 2015, eOrganic published a data-rich Farm System Description of Woodleaf Farm in Oroville, California as part of a WSARE Project led by Alex Stone of Oregon State University: "Integrating Research and Practice in Systems Management of Organic Farms". The project focuses on long-term organic farms that have kept detailed records on soil and nutrient management, pest management, and disease management, and examines the outcomes of their farm management strategies. Additional farm system descriptions will be published in 2016.

Our 5 most popular articles in 2015 were:

Videos

eOrganic posted transcripts and links to the following videos in 2015:

The eOrganic YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/eOrganic houses eOrganic's 534 videos. The channel has over 5,300 subscribers and over 2.2 million views. Our most popular videos in 2015 were:

Organic Farming Research Websites

eOrganic is currently working with 24 USDA NIFA funded research and outreach projects. eOrganic supports these groups in diverse ways, including technical support for the development of articles and videos, peer-refereed and NOP-compliance review, video production training and editing, web conferencing, conference broadcasting, workspaces for project management, and public websites. For some of these projects, eOrganic hosts public websites where you can learn about the project goals and personnel, and find results and reports as they become available.

In 2015, new materials including farmer profiles and a business planning guide on organic transition were posted to the Tools for Transition Project website, and new fact sheets were posted to the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug website. The Organic Agriculture Research Symposium website contains proceedings and links to recorded presentations from the conference in 2015, and new recordings from the 2016 conference will be available soon.

  • Breeding Non-commodity Corn for Organic Production Systems
  • Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Organic Farming Systems
  • Carrot Improvement for Organic Agriculture
  • NOVIC Website
  • Organic Agriculture Research Symposium
  • Organic Cucurbit Research: Critical Pest Management Challenges
  • Organic Management of Spotted Wing Drosophila
  • Organic Reduced Tillage in the Pacific Northwest
  • Principles for Transitioning to Organic Farming
  • Tomato Organic Management and Improvement Project (TOMI)
  • Tools for Transition

eOrganic also hosts the following special websites: an organic variety trial database to which users can upload trial reports, which was created with the NOVIC project and the Organic Seed Alliance, and a gallery of colorful and nutritious organic carrot varieties in development for the Carrot Improvement for Organic Agriculture project. If you have trial results to share and are interested in participating in the Organic Variety Trial Database, please contact Jared Zystro of the Organic Seed Alliance.

Ask an Expert

Ask an Expert is a free service that anyone can use to get answers to questions from Land Grant University (LGU) and Extension professionals through eXtension.org. Ask your question at https://ask.extension.org/groups/1668/ask—you can even submit an image to help with a diagnosis.

eOrganic provides oversight of all questions tagged with "organic production" within the Ask-an-Expert system. Our staff finds an answer by either answering the question directly or by soliciting the best possible response from our eOrganic members. In 2015, community members answered approximately 57 questions. Almost 1,300 organic agriculture questions have been answered through the service since its inception. We encourage you to use this free and underutilized service for answers to your organic farming questions. Find it at https://ask.extension.org/groups/1668/ask

Get involved with eOrganic

eOrganic is a Community of Practice, which means it relies on community members like you to help it grow and better serve our farmer and agricultural professional stakeholders by developing and delivering critical and timely resources. If you are a researcher or Extension educator with expertise in organic agriculture, eOrganic wants you to write an article, shoot a video, deliver a webinar, or develop and teach an online course. All of our articles and videos undergo NOP-compliance and peer review before publication. For more information on how to get involved with eOrganic, join eOrganic at http://eorganic.info or contact Alice Formiga at alice.formiga@hort.oregonstate.edu.

Write eOrganic into Your Next Grant Proposal

For complete information on the diverse opportunities eOrganic offers project groups and how to write eOrganic into your proposal, visit http://eOrganic.info/proposal. During the past year, eOrganic received subawards from 20 ongoing OREI and ORG projects. We can also partner with you on regional IPM, AFRI, SARE, NRCS-CIG and proposals from other funding sources. A 2-page handout describing our services to funded projects, which can be distributed at meetings, can be found here.

eOrganic can offer your project:

  • Web conferencing with the option of online or toll-free phone audio
  • Webinars and webinar series to stakeholders and the public
  • eXtension publication editing, and peer and NOP-compliance review
  • Video training, editing, review, and posting to the web
  • Online course development and support
  • Outreach for your publications, videos, webinars and websites to our established network of 9,000 farmers, extension personnel, agricultural professionals, and researchers from around the country and the globe—at conferences and through our newsletters and social networking activities
  • Ask an Expert support
  • Project workspace at eOrganic.info to facilitate project communication and management
  • Project websites that are easily managed by your project members from eOrganic.info (see http://eorganic.info/novic)
  • Analytics information for reporting on your articles, videos, webinars and courses. Evaluation for webinars and conference broadcasts.
Stay in touch!

  YouTube Twitter

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 17153

Growing the eOrganic Community: Annual Report 2015

lun, 2016/02/29 - 18:28

Contents

eOrganic Annual Report 2015

eOrganic completed its seventh year in 2015 as the Organic Agriculture Community of Practice at http://www.extension.org. Our goals are to engage farmers, agricultural professionals, and other members of the organic agriculture community with timely and relevant science-, experience-, and regulation-based information in a variety of formats; and to foster a national organic research and outreach community. Through articles, videos, webinars and conference broadcasts, we make organic research available to the public.

More than 300 eOrganic members and collaborators have actively contributed to eOrganic by authoring and/or reviewing articles, producing or reviewing videos, answering Ask an Expert questions, presenting webinars, or attending outreach and leadership events. Read about our accomplishments in 2015 and our upcoming plans for the 2016 season.

Outreach to Farmers and Agricultural Information Providers

To help spread the word about eOrganic and the resources we provide, we had booths at several large organic farmer events in 2015, including the EcoFarm Conference in Pacific Grove, California, the MOSES conference in La Crosse, Wisconsin, the Organicology Conference in Portland, Oregon, and the Small Farms Conference at Oregon State University. We sincerely thank all of our volunteers, including Helen Atthowe, Carl Rosato, Ingrid West, and Mike Hass, for their help in staffing eOrganic exhibits.

To keep researchers, educators, service providers, and farmers aware of our resources, including our webinars, we publish eOrganic Updates. More than 12,000 people received these notices in 2015. In addition, eOrganic maintains an active presence on social media sites such as Facebook, where we have 3,930 likes; and Twitter, where we have 2,948 followers. We also publish a bi-monthly newsletter that reaches over 12,000 subscribers. In 2015, eOrganic pages at extension.org attracted over 642,000 page views (of over 2 million total views). Our YouTube channel attracted over 390,000 views, leading it to surpass 2.2 million total views.

eOrganic Webinars and Conference Broadcasts

Since December of 2009, we've offered our popular winter webinar series, attended by farmers, Extension educators, researchers, organic inspectors and certifiers, Master Gardeners, and agriculture professionals. These webinars, which contain information on the latest organic research and practical farming techniques, allow people from all over the world to hear a presentation, view the presentation slides, and type in questions—all without having to leave their farms or travel to conferences. Presentations are recorded and made available for viewing at any time from eOrganic's YouTube channel. To date, eOrganic has delivered more than 150 webinars attended by over 18,000 attendees, of which, on average, 30% were farmers. In addition, eOrganic broadcasts selected presentations from national organic conferences live online and archives the presentations on YouTube.

The 2015 season featured live presentations from the Organic Agriculture Research Symposium and Organicology conferences, as well as 19 webinars on diverse topics such as insect and disease management, ancient and heritage wheat varieties, compost tea, weed management, variety trials, extreme weather challenges, and native bee pollinators. Many of the webinars were based on new research from USDA NIFA Organic Research and Extension Initiative and Organic Transitions Program projects. We have many more webinars scheduled for 2016. You can find all eOrganic upcoming and archived webinars and live broadcasts at http://www.extension.org/pages/25242.

Highlights of the 2015 Webinar and Broadcast Season Webinar Evaluation

In 2015, 2,775 people attended eOrganic webinars and live conference broadcasts. Across all webinars, 49% responded to post-webinar evaluation surveys. Of these, approximately 30% were farmers, 8% were Extension personnel, 8% were researchers, 5% were from nonprofits, 10% were agriculture professionals, 11% worked for government agencies, and 5% were organic inspectors or certifiers. Survey respondents' geographic affiliations were: 29% Northeast, 22% Central, 12% South, 21% West, and 16% other named regions or countries. Across all webinars, 75% said the webinars significantly or moderately improved their understanding of the topic, 22% said "a little improved" and 3% said "not improved". 75% of respondents planned to apply the knowledge they gained in the webinars a lot or somewhat, 20% said "a little" and 5% said "not at all". 81% said the technical level of the webinars was "just right", 7% thought they were too technical, and 12% thought they were too basic. 78% would recommend the webinars to others, 18% might recommend them, and 4% would not. 96% of respondents thought access to the webinars was easy, 2% said it was somewhat difficult, and less than 1% said access was very difficult.

Webinar feedback in 2015:
  • "Great presentation. Looking forward to future webinars particularly on insect pests and management. Thanks to eOrganic for providing an effective information delivery system between scientists/educators and end-users."
  • "The webinar was very helpful. Alex (Lyon) did a fantastic job. Thanks for all the work eOrganic does to bring organic research to a wider audience. This is such a fantastic resource for the organic community."
  • "No doubt these are among the most knowledgeable people in the country on the subject and the research they presented is very current and relevant."
  • "The discussion about the different pests and the different crops was helpful. Also, finally somebody is listening to the farmers!"
Online Courses

The eOrganic Dairy Team continues to offer its asynchronous online course, "An Introduction to Organic Dairy Production" as part of "Development of Technical Training and Support for Agricultural Service Providers and Farmers in Certified Organic Dairy Production Systems" USDA NIFA Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative (OREI) project. Course developers and instructors included: Cindy Daley and Audrey Denney, California State University-Chico; Heather Darby and Deb Heleba, University of Vermont Extension; Sarah Flack, Sarah Flack Consulting; Sid Bosworth, University of Vermont; and Karen Hoffman, USDA NRCS. The course is composed of 10 modules addressing a range of topics related to certified organic dairy production, including certification, soil health, pasture and forages, herd health and nutrition, milk quality, and calf management. Each module has required readings, a narrated PowerPoint presentation from an expert on the topic, and recommended additional resources. CCA CEUs are available. In 2015, seven farmers and service providers participated in the course. Find a full description and a link to the course at http://www.extension.org/pages/69299.

In 2015, the eOrganic dairy team, led by Cindy Daley and Heather Darby, worked to develop a second online course. "On the Ground: A Closer Look at Organic Dairy Pasture, Forages, and Soils" is a self-directed online course designed for Extension educators and other agriculture service providers, as well as farmers and students who want to move beyond the basics and better understand how healthy soils lead to healthy livestock feeds. It is a follow up to "An Introduction to Organic Dairy Production", which is a prerequisite for taking this course. 

eOrganic is currently recruiting service providers and farmers to beta test the course; please contact Debra Heleba at debra.heleba@uvm.edu

eOrganic also continues to offer the Organic Seed Production course, in which approximately 275 people have enrolled. The course consists of a set of tutorials covering the fundamentals of seed production for onions, beets and chard, brassicas, carrots, and wet-seeded crops, as well as climatic requirements for seed crops, important diseases, and seed quality. Find this free course on the eXtension Moodle campus site at http://campus.extension.org/enrol/index.php?id=377.

eOrganic Articles

All eOrganic articles can be found at www.extension.org/organic_production. Before publication, every article is subject to two anonymous peer reviews and National Organic Program compliance review.

eOrganic published the following articles in 2015: Farm System Descriptions

In 2015, eOrganic published a data-rich Farm System Description of Woodleaf Farm in Oroville, California as part of a WSARE Project led by Alex Stone of Oregon State University: "Integrating Research and Practice in Systems Management of Organic Farms". The project focuses on long-term organic farms that have kept detailed records on soil and nutrient management, pest management, and disease management, and examines the outcomes of their farm management strategies. Additional farm system descriptions will be published in 2016.

Our 5 most popular articles in 2015 were:

Videos

eOrganic posted transcripts and links to the following videos in 2015:

The eOrganic YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/eOrganic houses eOrganic's 534 videos. The channel has over 5,300 subscribers and over 2.2 million views. Our most popular videos in 2015 were:

Organic Farming Research Websites

eOrganic is currently working with 24 USDA NIFA funded research and outreach projects. eOrganic supports these groups in diverse ways, including technical support for the development of articles and videos, peer-refereed and NOP-compliance review, video production training and editing, web conferencing, conference broadcasting, workspaces for project management, and public websites. For some of these projects, eOrganic hosts public websites where you can learn about the project goals and personnel, and find results and reports as they become available.

In 2015, new materials including farmer profiles and a business planning guide on organic transition were posted to the Tools for Transition Project website, and new fact sheets were posted to the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug website. The Organic Agriculture Research Symposium website contains proceedings and links to recorded presentations from the conference in 2015, and new recordings from the 2016 conference will be available soon.

  • Breeding Non-commodity Corn for Organic Production Systems
  • Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Organic Farming Systems
  • Carrot Improvement for Organic Agriculture
  • NOVIC Website
  • Organic Agriculture Research Symposium
  • Organic Cucurbit Research: Critical Pest Management Challenges
  • Organic Management of Spotted Wing Drosophila
  • Organic Reduced Tillage in the Pacific Northwest
  • Principles for Transitioning to Organic Farming
  • Tomato Organic Management and Improvement Project (TOMI)
  • Tools for Transition

eOrganic also hosts the following special websites: an organic variety trial database to which users can upload trial reports, which was created with the NOVIC project and the Organic Seed Alliance, and a gallery of colorful and nutritious organic carrot varieties in development for the Carrot Improvement for Organic Agriculture project. If you have trial results to share and are interested in participating in the Organic Variety Trial Database, please contact Jared Zystro of the Organic Seed Alliance.

Ask an Expert

Ask an Expert is a free service that anyone can use to get answers to questions from Land Grant University (LGU) and Extension professionals through eXtension.org. Ask your question at https://ask.extension.org/groups/1668/ask—you can even submit an image to help with a diagnosis.

eOrganic provides oversight of all questions tagged with "organic production" within the Ask-an-Expert system. Our staff finds an answer by either answering the question directly or by soliciting the best possible response from our eOrganic members. In 2015, community members answered approximately 57 questions. Almost 1,300 organic agriculture questions have been answered through the service since its inception. We encourage you to use this free and underutilized service for answers to your organic farming questions. Find it at https://ask.extension.org/groups/1668/ask

Get involved with eOrganic

eOrganic is a Community of Practice, which means it relies on community members like you to help it grow and better serve our farmer and agricultural professional stakeholders by developing and delivering critical and timely resources. If you are a researcher or Extension educator with expertise in organic agriculture, eOrganic wants you to write an article, shoot a video, deliver a webinar, or develop and teach an online course. All of our articles and videos undergo NOP-compliance and peer review before publication. For more information on how to get involved with eOrganic, join eOrganic at http://eorganic.info or contact Alice Formiga at alice.formiga@hort.oregonstate.edu.

Write eOrganic into Your Next Grant Proposal

For complete information on the diverse opportunities eOrganic offers project groups and how to write eOrganic into your proposal, visit http://eOrganic.info/proposal. During the past year, eOrganic received subawards from 20 ongoing OREI and ORG projects. We can also partner with you on regional IPM, AFRI, SARE, NRCS-CIG and proposals from other funding sources. A 2-page handout describing our services to funded projects, which can be distributed at meetings, can be found here.

eOrganic can offer your project:

  • Web conferencing with the option of online or toll-free phone audio
  • Webinars and webinar series to stakeholders and the public
  • eXtension publication editing, and peer and NOP-compliance review
  • Video training, editing, review, and posting to the web
  • Online course development and support
  • Outreach for your publications, videos, webinars and websites to our established network of 9,000 farmers, extension personnel, agricultural professionals, and researchers from around the country and the globe—at conferences and through our newsletters and social networking activities
  • Ask an Expert support
  • Project workspace at eOrganic.info to facilitate project communication and management
  • Project websites that are easily managed by your project members from eOrganic.info (see http://eorganic.info/novic)
  • Analytics information for reporting on your articles, videos, webinars and courses. Evaluation for webinars and conference broadcasts.
Stay in touch!

  YouTube Twitter

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 17153

CSI: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) Egg Mass Damage

lun, 2016/02/08 - 17:42

eOrganic authors:

Rob Morrison, USDA-ARS Appalachian Fruit Research Station

Clarissa Matthews, Shepherd University

Introduction

In this video, we highlight research being funded by USDA-NIFA OREI program on Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs in Organic Farming Systems. 

The goal of this research has been to quantify who the main predators of BMSB egg masses are, the kinds of damage they cause, and  link the types of damage to specific predator groups. We have found that feeding damage by predators can be sorted into several different categories. These primarily depend on predator mouthpart morphology (e.g. the structures used for eating) and prey handling behavior (e.g. how predators eat their food).

More recently, this research has expanded to look at how different stages of BMSB have different communities of natural enemies. Ultimately, we hope to be able to better characterize the natural enemy community so that we can start designing landscapes to improve their effectiveness in managing BMSB.

Drs. Rob Morrison and Clarissa Mathews created the video, and Emily Fraser performed the narration. Research technician Brittany Poling made a guest appearance.

Video Transcript

When you think of insects, you might think of creepy crawlies infesting your home. But, not all insects are pests. In fact, many insects are beneficial and actually kill pests. These so-called "natural enemies" of pests are naturally-occurring predators or parasitoids that make their living by attacking various stages of other insects, and as a result, are beneficial to you and me.
Researchers studying an invasive pest from Asia, the brown marmorated stink bug, have been facing a dilemma. This smelly bug is a nuisance to homeowners and is wrecking havoc on farms across the mid-Atlantic region where it inserts its straw-like mouthparts into luscious fruits and vegetables, causing major economic losses. To better understand if our native natural enemies are starting to eat this invasive bug, researches have been placing eggs of the pest in agricultural crops and waiting to see what happens.

It was expected that parasitoids would attack the stink bug’s eggs. However, researchers have been noticing inexplicable damage to the eggs that is not caused by parasitoids. Increasingly, scientists have begun to think this damage may be caused by another natural enemy -- the predators.

Because it is not possible to watch the BMSB eggs while they are exposed in the field, we’ve embarked on a case of entomological whodunit. Think CSI meets Bill Nye. In the lab, we have been carefully photographing egg masses before allowing specific predators to feed, and then taking photographs afterwards to document specific types of damage caused by specific predator groups. This catalogue of photos will be helpful to ascribe certain types of egg damage we see in the field to specific predator groups and will help us quantify the impact of native predators in controlling BMSB populations.
Here are some highlights. It turns out that the way that a predator eats its dinner is important for the fate of an egg mass. Some predators, such as jumping spiders will completely remove an egg mass from the substrate, invert it, and eat the eggs individually, very slowly sucking the fluids out of the egg, with many of the eggs remaining after it is done.

Other predators, such as earwigs, are voracious and will mostly devour an egg mass, leaving only small fragments of egg shells, but still in the restricted area of the original egg mass. Yet other predators will pull off eggs individually, consume them, drop the remains elsewhere and repeat, such as ground beetles.

The damage caused to an egg mass, number of eggs affected, pattern of fragmentation, and sometimes whether an egg mass in the field is even present when retrieved, can all suggest a specific predator group. This information can be used by other researchers to get a better idea of the good work our native predators are doing to help control the invasive BMSB.
Our work has expanded more generally to understand how the native predator communities use different stages of BMSB. For instance, while assassin bugs won’t eat the eggs, they will readily attack the nymphs. Other predators, for example, the predatory spined soldier bug, eats eggs AND nymphs of the pest.

Ultimately, we hope this research will allow us to identify key predator groups, so we bolster these natural enemies in the field, and in the end, stop the stink bug invasion.
 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16609

What is eOrganic, and How Can Partnering with eOrganic Benefit My Project?

mar, 2016/01/26 - 18:06
What is eOrganic? eOrganic (at eXtension.org/organic_production) is the eXtension Resource Area for Organic Agriculture

You can find eOrganic’s resources for farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, certifiers, researchers and educators seeking reliable information on organic agriculture at eXtension.org (pronounced e-extension). eOrganic’s initial content focused on general organic agriculture, dairy production, and vegetable production, but eOrganic members are now developing content on other farming systems and topics. All content is collaboratively authored and peer-reviewed by eOrganic’s community of University researchers and Extension personnel, other agricultural professionals, farmers, and certifiers with experience and expertise in organic agriculture.

eOrganic Goals
  1. To engage farmers, agricultural professionals and other members of the organic agriculture community with timely and relevant science-, experience-and regulation-based information in a variety of media and educational formats
  2. To facilitate project management, communication, and publication to eXtension.org
  3. To foster a national organic research and outreach community
Read a 2012 HortTechnology article about eOrganic and the 2014 eOrganic Annual Report Find all our published content at www.eXtension.org/organic_production Articles

eOrganic’s articles cover everything from the nuts and bolts of organic production for beginners to the latest information and technology for advanced producers. Find our articles http://extension.org/organic_production or download a publication list at http://eorganic.info/publications.

Videos

Because a moving picture is worth a thousand words, short video segments highlighting organic practices are featured at eOrganic. Producers and researchers demonstrate innovative cover cropping, reduced tillage, cultivation, soil management, pest management and marketing strategies. You can find eOrganic’s videos at eXtension and at eOrganic’s YouTube channel.

Webinars

Our webinar series allows farmers, agricultural professionals and others to participate in live presentations by researchers, educators and farmers. To ask a question, participants type a question in the chat box. Find over 100 archived webinars and upcoming webinar information at http://www.extension.org/25242

Ask-an-Expert

People need answers to questions that aren’t currently answered in eOrganic’s content. To get an answer, eOrganic supports eXtension’s Ask-an-Expert. Users submit questions at eXtension.org and a community member or members with appropriate expertise reply to the request via email. Find Ask-an-Expert at http://www.extension.org/ask

eOrganic (at eOrganic.info) is a developing virtual organic agriculture research/outreach community

You can participate in a national organic agriculture research/outreach community at eOrganic.info, eOrganic’s virtual workspace and community hub. eOrganic community members convene at eOrganic.info to network, discuss, learn together, collaborate, manage research/outreach projects, and publish peer-reviewed articles, videos, and other content to eXtension.org. 


Take a tour of eOrganic's public content and its community hub at http://eorganic.info/tour

Why would I want to include eOrganic in my proposal?

Increasingly, funders are asking for proposals with

  • A significant extension component including stakeholder engagement
  • Integration of research and extension
  • A partnership with an eXtension Community of Practice. An eOrganic partnership can help your project deliver all three.

eOrganic offers tools to facilitate your project’s delivery of high quality, peer-reviewed resources to a growing national audience of farmers, extension and other agricultural professionals, certifiers, educators, and researchers. eOrganic’s pages at eXtension.org have received more than 1.3 million page views since January 2009, and its YouTube videos have been viewed over 1.8 million times. And eOrganic not only delivers web resources, it also directly engages its growing audience. eOrganic’s community has answered more than 1,000 Ask-an-Expert questions. Over 15,000 people from all over the country have attended more than 100 webinars hosted by eOrganic. eOrganic communicates bi-monthly with its more than 9,000 newsletter subscribers and keeps in frequent touch with its 3,600 Facebook fans, 2,500 Twitter followers, and 4,000 Youtube subscribers. eOrganic also reaches out to farmers and agricultural professionals through booths and other activities at organic farming conferences across the US each winter.

eOrganic is also a virtual community and workspace at eOrganic.info – there, your group has the use of project and group management tools, the opportunity to manage a public project website with interactive tools, easy publication of resources to eXtension, and access to eOrganic’s webinars, Ask-an-Expert, and other engagement tools - all of these strategies facilitate integration of research and extension as well as collaborator and stakeholder engagement.

Why NOT partner with eOrganic?

What can my research/outreach project DO with eOrganic?

As member groups of eOrganic, research/outreach projects can:

Engage farmers and the agricultural professionals supporting them
  • Develop and publish articles, learning lessons, manuals, resource guides, research reports, or other text and image-based resources to eXtension.org
  • Develop and publish videos to eOrganic’s YouTube site and eXtension.org
    • demonstrate techniques (Calculating Dry Matter Intake at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSYflqjP6B0)
    • deliver a one hour webinar in short segments that can be uploaded to Youtube as clips (example: Late Blight Management playlist)
    • coordinate a video series on a specific topic (http://www.extension.org/pages/18726)
    • embed videos in articles (http://www.extension.org/pages/18571)
    • In late spring, eOrganic video staff conduct a virtual video capture training in which eOrganic projects and members can learn to plan and capture high quality, easily-editable video using low cost tools and simple strategies. Video that is captured according to the training guidelines is edited by eOrganic staff and uploaded to eOrganic’s YouTube site; from there they can be easily embedded into eOrganic articles or other websites or used in virtual or in-person trainings. Find the course at http://eorganic.info/node/7345 and a video made by researchers at Ohio State in partnership with eOrganic's video program http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMVCPbPUTb0&feature=youtu.be
  • Coordinate/deliver webinars and webinar series
    • deliver a webinar on your project to farmers (Planning for Flexibility in Effective Crop Rotations at http://www.extension.org/pages/26734)
    • coordinate a webinar series on a timely topic for farmers -- your group can present the first webinar; invite 3 other research/outreach groups or farmers to present the others. Consider pairing up researchers and farmers as presenters, or farmers as sole presenters (Planning Your Organic Farm for Profit at http://www.extension.org/pages/26410).
  • Broadcast a live presentation through eOrganic as in Healthy Soils for a Healthy Dairy Farm from the NOFA NY Organic Dairy and Field Crop Conference
  • Broadcast an entire, or part, of a conference through eOrganic as in the 2014 Organic Seed Growers Conference or the USDA 2011 Organic Farming Systems Conference in Washington, D.C., found at http://www.extension.org/pages/33545.
  • Develop course materials and coordinate courses through eXtension's Moodle Campus  - see the Organic Seed Production course developed by Organic Seed Alliance as an example (you must register as a user of the Moodle Campus to access the course). Resources developed for non-credit courses can also be used in online or campus-based credit courses.
  • Develop an interactive database or learning tool to support a participatory project and foster researcher-farmer, farmer-farmer engagement/learning. For example, see the NOVIC project sponsored Organic Variety Trial Database.
  • Describe your project and engage your cooperators and stakeholders through a public website that you manage through eOrganic.info. As examples, see:  Tools for Transition and NOVIC
  • What are your ideas? eOrganic can support your web development, video editing, course development, and other needs to transform your Web 2.0 ideas into reality.
Develop a course
  • Introduction to Organic Dairy Production Course

Members of the eOrganic Dairy Team received a NIFA OREI grant "Development of Technical Training and Support for Agricultural Service Providers and Farmers in Certified Organic Dairy Production Systems" in 2010. Cindy Daley and Audrey Denney at California State University-Chico, Sarah Flack of Sarah Flack Consulting, and Heather Darby and Deb Heleba at University of Vermont Extension developed "An Introduction to Organic Dairy Production" online course composed of 10 modules addressing certification, soil health, pasture and forages, herd health and nutrition, milk quality, and calf management. Each module has required readings, a narrated powerpoint presentation from an expert on the topic, and recommended additional resources. The course was piloted in fall 2012 with a group of 57 undergraduate students at Chico State. Students took the course either entirely online, or online with supplemental in-person instruction. An end-of-course survey revealed that all students gained knowledge on all topics covered through the course. One student said, "The information is solid. Being that I am headed back to my dairy, I will certainly use the knowledge I gained from this course." Still another said, "Having this knowledge will really give me a "one-up" on a lot of other people in the industry, as the organic side of things is becoming more prevalent in farming. Whatever direction I may go in, I can always use this information to try to better operations and educate other farmers." The course will be offered through eXtension's Moodle campus in early 2013 for farmers, Extension educators, and agriculture service providers. Find the course at http://www.extension.org/pages/69299

  • Organic Seed Production Course

An eOrganic course on Organic Seed Production was developed by Jared Zystro and collaborators at the Organic Seed Alliance. The course covers the fundamentals of seed production for onions, beets and chard, brassicas, carrots, and wet seeded crops, as well as climatic requirements for seed crops, important diseases, and seed quality. After having been peer-reviewed and checked for organic certification compliance, the course is now available on the eXtension Moodle campus site at http://campus.extension.org/enrol/index.php?id=377.

  • Video Production Course

eOrganic is training members in video storyboarding, filming, and production planning through its Introduction to Video Production course at the http://eorganic.info/node/7345. eOrganic will offer the course again in 2015.

Manage your project and engage geographically-distributed project members:
  • Manage your project, participate in eOrganic.info, and publish to eXtension through a project-specific group workspace at eOrganic.info. Here your group can use project and group management and publication tools including:
    • file and image sharing
    • group pages, for meeting notes and other collaborative documents such as proposals and reports
    • discussion forum
    • article collaboration, editing, review, and publication to eXtension
    • publication of other types of content to eXtension
    • webconferencing
    • calendar
    • technical support for eOrganic.info and other web 2.0 tools
  • Engage your project members and collaborators, including researchers, educators, farmers and agricultural professionals
    • collaborate more effectively with collaborators from other institutions or locations by including them as members of your group workspace
    • develop a project-specific public website where vetted project members can upload files and share ideas in a discussion forum
    • extend your in-person meetings or workshops through webconferencing and broadcasting tools supported by eOrganic
Evaluate your eOrganic content

All eOrganic evaluation activities maintain participant confidentiality and are coordinated with IRB oversight and approval.

  • Evaluation of eOrganic WebinarsWebinar participants must provide contact information, allowing eOrganic to contact them subsequently to ask them about the webinar as well as other eOrganic content.
    • Polling during the webinars. The “polling” system within GoToWebinar can be used by webinar presenters to ask participants a small number of questions during the webinar. Responses are automatically recorded in the GoToWebinar data, and poll results can be shown to participants during the webinar.
    • Post-webinar surveys: During the webinar registration process participants are notified they will be asked to complete a very brief survey after the webinar. At the end of the webinar, the importance of the survey is emphasized and participants are told to expect an email invitation. Post-webinar surveys also include questions about participant experiences with eOrganic articles, videos, other live or recorded webinars, Ask an Expert, or any other specific content related to the webinar (for example, other project-specific content or activities).
    • Surveys of webinar participants the following year: To assess the impact of the webinar on participant practices, a survey can be sent to webinar participants the yearfollowing webinar delivery. Webinar presenters identify practices that could have been changed as the result of that specific webinar. Questions are crafted to solicit impact feedback from farmers as well as the agricultural professionals supporting farmers, or any other audience group.
      Example:
      As the result of attending the eOrganic late blight webinar, in the summer of 2010 I (select all that apply):
      1. destroyed potato cull piles
      2. planted and managed my tomatoes and potatoes to maximize air flow and leaf drying
      3. scouted my fields regularly for late blight symptoms
      4. carefully managed my irrigation to minimize leaf wetness (timing of overhead irrigation, use of drip irrigation)
      5. planted late blight resistant varieties
      6. prophylactically applied copper or other materials
      7. other (please describe _____________________________________)

  • Evaluation of eOrganic articles and other content:

eOrganic will work with each project group to identify stakeholders from whom to solicit feedback on the quality and utility of the project’s eOrganic content. The project group will identify individuals and their contact information. eOrganic will send these individuals surveys by email (and/or mail), and follow up with emails and phone calls to improve response rate. Surveys will ask the individual to select one or more articles or videos from a list and fill out a survey about that specific article or video. Surveys will include questions including: Which of the following best describes your work? Where do you work? How much did this article or video improve your understanding of the topic? Do you intend to apply the knowledge you gained from this article or video to your work? Would you recommend this article or video to others? Additional questions can be crafted, including questions about changes in intentions or practices.

How can I include eOrganic in my proposal?

Just like with any other collaborative effort, an effective eOrganic plan of work takes time to develop. Please contact us early in the proposal development process so we can work with you to develop your proposal’s eOrganic plan of work and budget. eOrganic will be written in as a subaward in your project’s budget.

Why is eOrganic asking that proposals include subawards to support eOrganic?

eOrganic requires funding to support the following eOrganic Core Services to your project and other groups and members of the organic research/outreach community.

eOrganic Core Services
  • Editorial management and publication to eXtension and Youtube for all public content (including copy editing, peer-refereed review and NOP compliance review)
  • Coordination of Ask-an-Expert
  • Coordination and technical support for webinars
  • Support for webconferencing and other networking tools and strategies
  • Development and member/group support for eOrganic.info, the community hub and publication workspace, including tools and support for project management and engagement
  • Evaluation of webinars and other public content
  • Outreach to farmers, extension and other agricultural professionals, researchers, and others through booths and presentations at farmer conferences, ads in farmer publications, activities at professional meetings, eOrganic’s public and community newsletters, and eOrganic’s Facebook and Twitter sites
What are the steps to eOrganic collaboration?

To include eOrganic in your project proposal, an eOrganic plan of work and budget must be included in the project proposal with eOrganic written in as a subaward. Contact eOrganic at least 2 weeks before your proposal is due to allow time to develop a project-specific eOrganic plan of work and budget and the subaward paperwork.

Contact eXtension:  Contact Craig Wood at eXtension.org for a letter of support (eOrganic can help you with this).

eOrganic Plans of Work and Budgets

Core Plan of Work for an Integrated Research/Outreach Project

This is a model plan of work; your project can adapt this plan as appropriate.  Please contact us with your content development ideas.

eOrganic Plan of Work for “ORG INTEGRATED PROJECT”

eOrganic will provide the group with a project workspace at eOrganic.info so the project can:
• use the workspace tools for more efficient project management, communication, and publication
• develop a simple public project website hosted at eOrganic.info through that workspace
• easily publish to eXtension.org/organic_production
eOrganic will also provide support for webconferencing so the project can communicate with its dispersed project personnel as well as project collaborators/stakeholders via web meetings.

eOrganic staff will provide training for project members in video capture; videos captured following video capture guidelines will be edited by eOrganic staff, moved through peer and NOP compliance review, and posted to eOrganic’s YouTube channel (from there they can be embedded in other websites, eOrganic articles, etc).

eOrganic will support the project with technical support and peer and NOP compliance review for the publication of:

• a webinar describing the project in year 1
• 3 articles on organic management of XX
• 4 short (1-3 minute) videos on farm or research strategies/tools to be embedded into websites and articles (eOrganic trains project staff in video capture; eOrganic staff edit, transcribe, manage review, and publish to YouTube)
• a 3-webinar series on XX (for example: farmer/researcher teams describe specific strategies, and how to integrate those into a whole-farm plan)
• a Moodle-based course on XX, utilizing all project information and publications - the resources and curricula developed can also be used in online and campus-based undergraduate and graduate courses

eOrganic will evaluate the quality and utility of webinars immediately following the webinar, and the impact of the webinar on participant practices and understanding in the winter following webinar deliver. eOrganic will evaluate the quality and utility of the rest of the project content in the last year of the project.

Core eOrganic Subaward Budget for an Integrated Research/Outreach Project: NEW REDUCED RATES FOR 2015 OREI and ORG PROJECTS

  (See end of document for model subaward budget narrative)

Project Total DIRECT Costs: eOrganic Core Subaward DIRECT Costs  (add indirect costs to the costs listed below)

<150K (project DIRECT costs):  5K in first year only (direct costs)
150-250K (project DIRECT costs):   9K (direct costs)
251-500K (project DIRECT costs):   12K (direct costs)
501K-750K (project DIRECT costs):   20K (direct costs)
751K-1M (project DIRECT costs): 30K (direct costs)
1M - 2M (project DIRECT costs):   50K (direct costs)
>2M: (project DIRECT costs):  50K (direct costs)

These core budgets provide direct support of your project activities as well as support for general eOrganic core functions including outreach, evaluation, Ask-an-Expert, and web platform development and support.

Detailed budget spreadsheet with costs per year including indirect costs for 2015 OREI projects

Plans of work and associated budgets will vary project-by-project. For more information on how to include eOrganic in your proposal and budgets, contact eOrganic.

Contact eOrganic: For more information or to discuss a proposal, contact Alice Formiga at alice.formiga@oregonstate.edu. Email is preferred so we can quickly answer your questions.

Budget Allocation and Narrative for eOrganic Subaward

For each project year, eOrganic will allocate your project's eOrganic subaward DIRECT costs as described below. eOrganic will then add appropriate indirect costs:

Each year:
B. Other Personnel: 87% of subaward direct costs
(Salary 62%, OPE 38%)
Personnel funds will support staff time for the coordination of the following core functions:
webinar series, content peer and NOP compliance review, copy editing, eOrganic.info/eXtension/Youtube/Facebook/Twitter site support and development, Ask-an-expert, outreach, and content quality and utility evaluation.

D. Travel: 9% of subaward direct costs
Travel funds will support eOrganic staff and CoP members to attend eXtension, professional society, and organic farming conferences to communicate about and market eOrganic to members and stakeholders.

F. Other Direct Costs

F.1. Materials and supplies: 4% of subaward direct costs

Outreach Materials funds purchase outreach materials and conference fees (bookmarks, brochures, banners, ads in conference brochures, booth fees).

Telecommunications fees support eOrganic’s webconferencing and webinar services (currently, GoToMeeting, Open Voice, FreeConference and GoToWebinar).

Computers and video-audio/IT supplies funds contribute to the purchase of staff computers, headsets, microphones, adapters and other IT supplies. 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 5611

Good Sense Food Safety Practices for Organic Diversified Vegetable Farms

mar, 2016/01/26 - 17:34

Join eOrganic for a webinar on good sense food safety practices on organic diversified vegetable farms by Chris Blanchard of Purple Pitchfork! The webinar takes place on March 16th at 2PM Eastern Time (1PM Central, 12PM Mountain, 11AM Pacific Time). The webinar is free and open to the public. Advance registration is required.

Register now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8024480323275610626

About the Webinar

As the demand for local and organic food has exploded in the last five years, so has the expectation on the part of consumers and institutional buyers for production and handling systems designed to minimize microbial contamination. Chris Blanchard will guide you through twelve simple steps you can take to put you and your farm on the way to safe food production, including practical food safety, and the steps you can take to put you and your farm on the path to safe food production.

In this webinar, Chris Blanchard provides perspective on the landscape for food safety in the fresh produce industry, and practical steps organic produce farmers can take to improve the microbiological food safety of their crops.

About the Presenter

Chris Blanchard provides consulting and education for farming, food, and business through Purple Pitchfork. As the owner and operator of Rock Spring Farm for fifteen years, Chris raised twenty acres of vegetables, herbs, and greenhouse crops, marketed through a 200-member year-round CSA, food stores, and farmers markets. Prior to 1999, Chris managed student farms, worked as an intern, packing house manager, plant breeding assistant, and farm manager, and provided consulting for a major organic processor, in California, Wisconsin, Maine, and Washington state. His workshops, writing, and consulting throughout the country about farm business concepts, food safety, organic vegetable production, and scaling-up have gained a reputation for fresh approaches, down-to-earth information, and honesty.

System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. Find more detailed system requirements here.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars here.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16491

Impacts of the Food Safety Modernization Act on Diversified Organic Vegetable Farms

mar, 2016/01/26 - 17:18

Join eOrganic for a webinar on the impacts of the Food Safety Modernization Act on Diversified Organic Vegetable Farms, by Erin Silva of the University of Wisconsin. The webinar takes place on March 29, 2016 at 2PM Eastern Time (1PM Central, 12PM Mountain, 11AM Pacific Time). The presentation is free and open to the public, and advance registration is required.

Register now at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8892256681358029570

About the Webinar

For produce farms, 2016 marks the beginning of timelines established for operations to come into compliance with the FDA’s regulations associated with the Food Safety Modernization Act. While it still remains unclear as to how many aspects of the regulation will look “on the ground”, this webinar will address what diversified organic vegetable farmers need to begin thinking about with respect to moving forward toward compliance.

About the Presenter

Erin Silva is an Assistant Professor in University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Department of Plant Pathology and State Extension Specialist in Organic and Sustainable Cropping Systems. A major focus of her Extension programming includes on-farm food safety for diversified vegetable farmers.

System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. For more detailed system requirments, go here.
 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16489

Organic Seed Treatments and Coatings

lun, 2016/01/25 - 12:54

eOrganic author:

Emily Gatch, Washington State University

This is an Organic Seed Resource Guide article.

Introduction

The purpose of any seed treatment is to improve seed performance in one or more of the following ways: 1) eradicate seedborne pathogens or protect from soilborne pathogens, 2) optimize ease of handling and accuracy of planting (reduce gaps in stand or the need for thinning of seedlings, particularly when mechanical planters are used), and 3) improve germination rates. In conventional production, seed is often treated with chemical fungicides which reduce seed and seedling losses due to seedborne and soilborne disease. Most seed protectants are not an option for organic growers; however, there are some seed treatments, such as priming, pelletizing, and the use of hot water or NOP-compliant protectants, that can be used by organic farmers to improve seed performance.

Certain crops are better candidates for seed treatment due to the nature of the seed (small or irregularly shaped) or the intended production regime. For example, pelleted seed is useful in head lettuce production because of the need for precision seeding, but is less advantageous for thick sowings of looseleaf lettuce in bed production. 

Organic Seed Treatments Priming

Primed seed has absorbed just enough water to dissolve germination inhibitors and activate the early stages of germination.  Primed seed is therefore in a suspended state of growth, so it germinates faster and more uniformly over a broader temperature range, reducing the likelihood of very thick or thin plant stands. Priming results in earlier seedling establishment, which can aid in fending of the attack of damping-off pathogens to which germinating seedlings are particularly vulnerable. Priming is usually performed in conjunction with a pelleting process to protect the primed seed, which has a shortened life expectancy.

Pelleting

A seed pellet is a coating, usually of clay mixed with other inerts, that streamlines the size, shape, and uniformity of a small, non-round seed such as those of lettuce, carrots, onions, and many herbs and flowers. Pelleting results in easier, safer, and more accurate mechanical seeding, thus reducing gaps in the field and the need for labor-intensive thinning. Ideally, the pelleting materials are somewhat permeable to oxygen and absorb water quickly so that the pellet splits immediately upon hydration. Conventional pelleting techniques using synthetic inert materials are not approved for organic use, but there are now several pelleting materials on the market that are approved for use on organic farms.

Seed Health Treatments

This is a broad category of treatments that includes hot water, biological and plant extracts, bleach disinfection, and biologicals (microbes). These treatments can improve seed and seedling health by eradicating seedborne pathogens from the seed or protecting germinating seeds from attack by soilborne pathogens.

Hot water treatment

The use of hot water treatment to eradicate seedborne diseases, particularly those caused by plant pathogenic bacteria, is well-established. While the technique does not work for large-seeded vegetable crops, it has proven effective for brassicas, carrots, tomatoes, and peppers, and, to a lesser degree, celery, lettuce, and spinach. The typical procedure consists of: 1) warming the seed in 100°F water,  2) heating the seed for 20-25 minutes, depending on the crop species, in a 122°F water bath, 3) cooling the seed for 5 minutes in cold water, and 4) rapid drying.  Precision in temperature and timing are important, as the seed embryo may be killed in hotter water or the disease incompletely eradicated in cooler water.

 

Crop

Temperature

Duration

Notes

broccoli

122 F

20 min

 

kale

122 F

20 min

 

mustards

122 F

20 min

 

collards

122 F

20 min

 

turnip

122 F

20 min

 

cabbage

122 F

25 min

 

cauliflower

122 F

20 min

 

Brussels sprouts

122 F

25 min

 

pepper

122 F

25 min

pepper may be more sensitive than tomato to hot water trt

tomato

122 F

25 min

can also try 125 F for 20 min

eggplant

122 F

25 min

 

carrot

122 F

20 min

 

celery

122 F

30 min

 

lettuce

118 F

30 min

lettuce is more sensitive; try small sample first and test viability

 

Hot water treatment can cause a reduction in vigor over time, so hot water treated seed should not be kept for longer than a season. The procedure is described in detail in resources cited below.  Some companies do their own hot water treatment or will custom hot water treatment upon grower request.  If a lot is not treated by the company and no testing has been done for pathogen detection, growers may conduct their own hot water treatment with a home set-up.  It should be noted that the company's liabilities are null and void if the grower treats the seed him/herself.  Only fresh seed of high vigor should be subjected to hot water treatment, as old seed or seed of low vigor may respond poorly to the stress of the treatment and have reduced viability.  Hot water treated seed should be used within one season; the storage life of the seed may be reduced by the treatment.  For more information see the Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet Hot Water Treatment of Vegetable Seeds to Eradicate Bacterial Plant Pathogens in Organic Production Systems (Miller and Ivey, 2005).


Plant extracts and oils

Evaluating plant extracts and oils as seed treatments is a new research area so there is currently little data on their efficacy. However, plant oils such as thyme, cinnamon, clove, lemongrass, oregano, savory, and garlic show some potential to suppress damping-off, and thyme oil is in use in Europe as a seed treatment. Pure soybean or mineral oils have been shown to reduce storage molds of maize and soybean.  Further research on the disease suppressive potential of these oils is necessary to determine the viability of essential oil-based seed treatment protocols.

Bleach disinfection

Bleach (sodium hypochlorite) can be used to surface-disinfest seeds as an alternative to hot water. Bleach will eliminate pathogens on the seed surface but will not eliminate pathogens beneath the seed coat. Sodium hypochlorite is allowed for use on organic farms to disinfect wash water, provided that the levels not exceed the maximum residual contamination levels of the Safe Drinking Water Act, which currently is 4 ppm expressed as chlorine [40 CFR 141.65].

Biological seed treatments

Biological seed treatments, alone or in conjunction with priming and pelleting processes, may have potential in some situations for improving seedling health.  In studies evaluating the efficacy of these microorganisms as seed treatments or drenches, results have been inconsistent. 

Products that are currently commercially available include Kodiak (Bacillus subtilis, Bayer CropSciences), Mycostop (Streptomyces grieseoviridis, Verdera), SoilGard (Gliocladium virens, Certis), T-22 Planter Box (Trichoderma harzianum, BioWorks), Actinovate (Streptomyces lydicus, Natural Industries).

Web Resources Journal Articles

Some journal articles can be downloaded at no charge from the web. Others are only available through a university library. Try accessing articles by searching Google Scholar. If you cannot access any of these articles, request a copy from the corresonding author (obtain that information from the abstract, which can typically be found on the web).

  • Effect of seed maturity on sensitivity of seeds towards physical sanitation treatments [Online].  S.P.C. Groot, Y. Birnbaum, N. Rop, H. Jalink, G. Forsberg, C. Kromphardt, S. Werner, E. Koch. 2006. Seed Science and Technology 34:403-413. Available at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ista/sst/2006/00000034/00000002/ar... (verified 2 April 2010).
  • Efficacy of hot water and chlorine for eradication of Cladosporium variabile, Stemphylium botryosum, and Verticillium dahliae from spinach seed [Online]. L.J. du Toit and P. Hernandez-Perez. 2005. Plant Disease 89: 1309-1312. Available at: http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/abs/10.1094/PD-89-1305 (verified 4 Jan 2009).
  • Efficacy of bacterial seed treatments for controlling Pythium root rot of winter wheat. E. A. Milus and C.S. Rothrock. 1997. Plant Disease 81:180-184.
  • Hot water treatment of carrot seeds: effects on seed-borne fungi, germination, emergence, and yield. A. Hermansen, G. Brodal, and G. Balvoll. 2000. Seed Science and Technology 27: 599 – 613
  • Hot water treatment of vegetable seed: an alternative seed treatment method to control seed-borne pathogens in organic farming. E. Nega,  R. Ulrich, S. Werner, M. Jahn. 2003. Journal of Plant Disease Protection 10:220-234.
  • Suppression of Fusarium colonization of cotton roots and Fusarium wilt by seed treatments with Gliocladium virens and Bacillus subtilis. J. Zhang, C.R. Howell, J.L. Starr. 1996. Biocontrol Science Technology 6: 175-187.
Organic Seed Enhancement Companies

Germain's Technology Group North America
http://www.germains.com (verified 16 Jan 2009)
8333 Swanston Lane
Gilroy, CA 95020
Phone: 408-848-8120

INCOTEC - Integrated Coating and Seed Technology, Inc.
http://www.incotec.com (verified 16 Jan 2009)
1293 Harkins Rd.
Salinas, CA 93901-2295
Phone: 831-757-4367

Kamterter II
3065 Pacheco Pass Rd
Gilroy, CA 95020
Phone: 408-842-4262
Email: seickholt@kamterter.com
Organic seed services.

Harris Moran Seed Company
http://www.harrismoran.com/ (verified 2 April 2010)
Phone (pelleting): 831-757-3652

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 749

Working with Local Organic Grains

ven, 2016/01/22 - 14:53

eOrganic invites you to a webinar by bakers and pasta makers on incorporating local grains into their businesses. The webinar takes place on March 8 at 2PM Eastern Time, 1PM Central, 12PM Mountain, 11AM Pacific Time. Like all our webinars, it is free and open to the public, and advance registration is required.

Register now at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4806230679405004545

About the Webinar

Join bakers and pasta makers for a webinar on the practical aspects of incorporating locally or regionally grown organic grains into a commercial enterprise. Four panelists will discuss why they began working with local grains, the development of their product lines and how they have dealt with such issues as sourcing local grain and flour, flour quality, pricing and marketing, and what customer reaction has been. Stefan Senders (Wide Awake Bakery, Trumansburg, NY), Peter Endriss (Runner & Stone Bakery and Restaurant, Brooklyn, NY), Dan Avery (Dakota Earth Bakery and Pasta Shop, Alcester, SD), and Steve Gonzalez (Sfoglini Pasta Shop, Brooklyn, NY) are included on the panel.

About the Presenters

Stefan Senders owns and operates the Wide Awake Bakery (Trumansburg, NY) in partnership with grain farmer Thor Oechsner and the Farmer Ground Flour mill. Wide Awake, which has been in business for nigh on five years, runs a large Community Supported Bakery. Stefan and the bakery have worked with OGRIN and NYC Greenmarket to teach bakers how to use NYS grains more successfully. In 2014 the bakery hosted a bread-making evaluation of modern and heritage wheat varieties sponsored by the Value-Added Grains for Local and Regional Food Systems Project.

Peter Endriss began his bread-baking career at Amy’s Bread in New York City. In 2006, after a stage in a bread bakery in his father’s hometown in southern Germany, Peter accepted the position as Head Baker of Per Se restaurant and Bouchon Bakery in New York City. After leaving Per Se, Peter spent time working at the Parisian bakery L’Étoile du Berger before moving to Italy. Upon returning to New York, Peter began working with Hot Bread Kitchen, and is now the Head Baker and co-owner of the bakery and restaurant, Runner & Stone, in Gowanus, Brooklyn.

Dan Avery draws unique experience from sales and marketing with an agri-business fortune 100 company. Using this experience, Dan and his wife Elizabeth began Dakota Earth, an unconventional gourmet bakery and pasta-making business in Alcester, SD. Dakota Earth is now known locally and regionally for its quality food products and has created an awareness and demand for food products made with heritage-identified grains.

Steve Gonzalez earned a degree in Culinary Arts from the Art Institute of Colorado and has been a chef for 14 years. He was first introduced to the art of handmade pasta while working at Vetri in Philadelphia. To refine his skills, Steve traveled to Europe, working first at El Raco de Can Fabes, a Three Star Michelin Restaurant in Sant Celoni, Spain and then in Italy at Frosio in Villa d’ Alme, Sapposenta in Cagliari, Sardegna and Trattoria Majda in Friuli. Since returning to America, Steve opened his own restaurant, Zavino, in Philadelphia and has worked at Insieme, Company, Hearth, Roberta’s and Frankies Spuntino in NYC. Together with co-owner Scott Ketchum, he now runs Sfoglini pasta shop in Brooklyn, NY, overseeing the production of small-batch, freshly extruded pasta, including pasta made from organic, locally grown hard red wheat and emmer.

System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. For more detailed system requirments, go here.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16395

New Times, New Tools: Cultivating Climate Resilience on Your Organic Farm

ven, 2016/01/22 - 14:47

Join eOrganic for a webinar by Laura Lengnick on Cultivating Resilience on Your Organic Farm! The webinar takes place on February 23, 2016 at 2PM Eastern Time, 1PM Central, 12PM Mountain, 11AM Pacific Time. Like all eOrganic webinars, it is free and open to the public, and advance registration is required.

Register now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4886818284651307521

About the Webinar

As we enter the 21st century, farm and food businesses face novel challenges created by climate change.  Weaving practical lessons from the field with the latest climate science and resilience thinking, author, educator, scientist and farmer Laura Lengnick draws on the adaptation stories of award-winning organic farmers growing food across the U.S. to teachabout successful farming strategies for managing increased weather variability and extremes. Learn how to assess your climate risk and use ecosystem-based adaptive management tools to cultivate climate resilience on your organic farm.

About the Presenter

Laura Lengnick is an award-winning soil scientist who has explored agricultural sustainability for more than 30 years as a researcher, policy-maker, educator, and farmer.  Her work in sustainable farming systems was nationally-recognized with a USDA Secretary’s Honor award in 2002 and she contributed to the 3rd National Climate Assessment as a lead author of the 2012 USDA report Climate Change and U.S. Agriculture: Effects and Adaptation. After more than a decade leading the sustainable agriculture program at Warren Wilson College, Laura left the college to offer ecosystem-based climate resilience planning services through Cultivating Resilience, LLC. Her new book, Resilient Agriculture: Cultivating Food Systems for a Changing Climate (New Society Publishers), examines climate change, resilience and the future of food through the adaptation stories of 25 award-winning sustainable producers across the U.S. See http://www.cultivatingresilience.com for more information about Laura’s work.

System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. For more detailed system requirments, go here.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Organic Seed Growers Conference 2016 Live Broadcast Feb 5-6

jeu, 2016/01/21 - 16:25

eOrganic is excited to be working with the Organic Seed Alliance to bring you a live webinar broadcast of selected presentations from the Organic Seed Grower's Conference on February 5th and 6th, 2016! This is our third time broadcasting this conference, which is taking place at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.

To attend this webinar broadcast, advance registration is required. Anyone can attend--it is free and open to the public. It takes place on February 5th and 6th and runs from 9-5 Pacific Time, with long breaks for lunch--see the schedule below and note the time zones!  You only need to register once--that will cover both days, and you can come on and leave the webinar as many times as you like, and you can attend the whole program or just the parts that interest you most. You can find recordings from the 2012 and 2014 Organic Seed Growers Conferences on the eOrganic YouTube channel.

Register now at:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2122779093305583618

Since this is a live event, we cannot guarantee exact start and end times, and the program may be subject to change.  Audience members will see the presentations and hear the speakers (we will not be showing video of the speakers). We will also be recording the talks, so if you are unable to attend the entire broadcast, you can check about a month later on our YouTube channel! To find out more about the in-person conference, check the Organic Seed Alliance website. We hope you can join us for this online broadcast and are grateful to the Organic Seed Alliance and USDA NIFA OREI for the opportunity to bring it to you!

Broadcast Program Friday, February 5th, 9-10:30AM Pacific (10 Mountain, 11 Central, 12 Eastern)
Seed Economics: How to Make Growing and Selling Seed More Profitable

Seed production brings multiple benefits to farm operations from improved seed security to increasing on-farm biodiveristy, but most seed growers struggle with assessing its true financial profitability. Presenters will share example enterprise budgets for on-farm seed production that highlight the important expenses and potential profitability of online packet sales, rack sales, and bulk sales to seed companies.

  • Sebastian Aguilar, Chickadee Farm
  • Daniel Brisebois, Tourne-Sol Co-operative Farm
  • Steve Peters, Organic Seed Alliance
  • Sarah Kleeger, Adaptive Seeds
Friday, February 5th, 1:30-3PM Pacific (2:30 Mountain, 3:30 Central, 4:30 Eastern)
Seed Equipment: On-farm Innovations

Seed producers are some of the most innovative engineers in agriculture. In this session, organic seed producers will share photos and stories about equipment they have modified or built to effectively harvest, thresh, and clean seed on their farms. Participants will have the opportunity to share their own on-farm innovations and learn from one another’s equipment hacks.

  • Petra Page-Mann, Fruition Seeds
  • Jared Zystro, Organic Seed Alliance
Friday, February 5th, 3:30-5 PM Pacific (4:30 Mountain, 5:30 Central, 6:30 Eastern)
Vegetable Breeding Research Updates

Hear updates on organic vegetable plant breeding projects from across the U.S., including the goals and methods for these projects, and plans to release varieties. Crops include winter squash, tomatoes, sweet corn, and carrots.

  • Edmund Frost, Twin Oaks Seed Farm
  • Jim Myers, Oregon State University
  • Phil Simon, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Alex Stone, Oregon State University
  • Bill Tracy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Jared Zystro, Organic Seed Alliance
Saturday, February 6th, 9-10:30 AM Pacific (10 Mountain, 11 Central, 12 Eastern)
Organic Cover Crop Seed Production

Cover crops are a critical tool for managing organic systems, but many farmers struggle with limited access to organic sources of appropriate regional varieties. Participants will learn about regional efforts to increase access to cover crop seed, and the potential ecological and economic incentives for on-farm cover crop seed production.

  • Ray Hicks, University of Georgia
  • Matt Leavitt, Albert Lea Seed
  • Sam McCullough, Nash's Organic Produce
Saturday, February 6th, 1:30-3 PM Pacific (2:30 Mountain, 3:30 Central, 4:30 Eastern)
Vegetable Seed Production: Scaling up

Growth in the organic seed market has resulted in a need for increased scale of production in the U.S. and Canada. Growing seed on the farm can be profitable when growing the right crops at the appropriate scale with the most suitable methodologies. This session will explore challenges, needs, and approaches for scaling up production. Presenters will discuss issues to consider when a seed operation decides to scales up and include farmers who have successfully expanded their seed business.

  • Aabir Dey, The Bauta Family Initiative on Canadian Seed Security
  • Steve Peters, Organic Seed Alliance
  • Andrew Rainey, Enza Zaden
  • Melanie Sylvestre, BC Eco Seed Co-op and UBC Farm
Saturday, February 6th, 3:30-5 PM Pacific (4:30 Mountain, 5:30 Central, 6:30 Eastern)
Managing Seed Borne Disease: Brassica Black Leg and Implications for Organic Seed Producers and Industry

2014 marked a widespread outbreak of Brassica black leg, Phoma lingam, in the Willamette Valley igniting an intensive risk management effort; including quarantine measures from the Oregon and Washington state departments of agriculture (ODA and WSDA). Black leg is a critical seed borne pathogen and poses a major threat to the seed industry and organic farmers in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Presenters will share practical management measures including new ODA rules and WSDA quarantine rule amendment on brassicas in relation to black leg. Learn about the important role organic seed industry and farmers play in helping reduce the risk of introducing and disseminating this and other seedborne pathogens on brassica seed.

  • Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University
  • Cindy Ocamb, Oregon State University
System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. For more detailed system requirments, go here.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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Organic Agriculture Research Symposium 2016 Live Broadcast

lun, 2016/01/11 - 18:09

Join eOrganic for a live broadcast of selected presentations from the 2016 Organic Agriculture Research Symposium!

The Organic Agriculture Research Symposium (OARS) will be held at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California on Wednesday, January 20, 2016. The plenary and key workshop sessions will be broadcast as webinars. Plenary speakers will be André Leu, President of Organic International / IFOAM and Mathieu Ngouajio, USDA/NIFA National Program Leader in Cropping Systems. Also livestreamed will be workshops on soil health, long-term and strategic research, and innovative educational systems. Funding for this live broadcast of the OARS  is provided by USDA NIFA OREI.

This webinar broadcast is free and open to the public. You can join and leave this webinar as many times as you wish on January 20th, but advance registration is required. Start time is 9AM Pacific Time (10 Mountain, 11 Central, 12 Eastern).

Register now at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5589622818350441474

Attendees will see the presentations and listen to a live broadcast of the speakers (we won't be showing video of the speakers). Many additional presentations from the conference will also be recorded and  made available later on the eOrganic YouTube channel and in our webinar archive. This is a broadcast from a live conference, so exact start and end times cannot be guaranteed, and the program may be subject to change. There will be several breaks in the program--see the schedule below and make sure you note the time zones!

Broadcast Program

9:00AM – 10:00AM Pacific Time (10AM Mountain, 11AM Central, 12PM Eastern Time)
Opening Keynote and Thematic Presentations

  •  André Leu, IFOAM / Organics International President. The Vital Role of Research to Advance Organic Agriculture Worldwide.
  • Mathieu Ngouajio, USDA/NIFA National Program Leader in Cropping Systems. USDA- NIFA support for Organic Agriculture Research, Education and Extension.

10:30AM – Noon Pacific Time (11:30AM Mountain, 12:30PM Central, 1:30PM Eastern Time)
Soil Health

  • Anthony Yannarell, University of Illinois. Management affects the weed suppression potential of soil microorganisms and green manures
  • James Stapleton, UC-ANR-KARE. Advances in Biosolarization Technology to Improve Soil Health and Organic Control of Soilborne Pests
  • Doug O’Brien, Doug O’Brien Agricultural Consulting. Trends in soilborne disease on two long-term organic vegetable farms in the west.
  • Moderator: Heather Darby, University of Vermont

1:00PM – 2:30PM Pacific Time (2PM Mountain, 3PM Central, 4PM Eastern Time)
Long-term and Strategic Research
 

  • Amélie Gaudin, UC Davis, Long-term research in organic system at Russell Ranch: Results and opportunities to build sustainable and resilient systems
  • Randy Jackson, University of Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Integrated Cropping Systems Trial: 26 years of research in agricultural sustainability
  • Diana Jerkins, Organic Farming Research Foundation. Assessment of Future Organic Research Needs
  • Moderator: Mark Lipson, UC Santa Cruz

2:45PM – 4:15PM Pacific Time (3:45 Mountain, 4:45 Central, 5:45 Eastern Time)
Innovative Educational Systems

  • Damien Parr, UC Santa Cruz. Integrating undergraduate interns in organic farming research and beginner farmer programming at the University of California, Santa Cruz
  • John Hendrickson, University of Minnesota. Principles for Transitioning to Organic Farming: e-Learning Materials and Decision Case Studies for Educators
  • Raul Villanueva, Texas A&M. Linking Organic Farmers and Students On Organic Production through Small Projects in South Texas
  • Moderator: Mark Van Horn, UC Davis
System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. Find more detailed system requirements here.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16199

Organic Poultry Production Systems

jeu, 2016/01/07 - 14:00

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic T1206

A Novel Nutritional Approach to Rearing Organic Pastured Broiler Chickens. Part 2

jeu, 2016/01/07 - 13:49

Join eOrganic for a webinar on pastured poultry by Michael Lilburn and Larry Phelan of the Ohio State University on February 16, 2016 at 2PM Eastern Time (1PM Central, 12PM Mountain, 11AM Pacific Time). The webinar is free and open to the public, and advance registration is required.

Register now at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5689766337316035841

About the Webinar

This webinar will include updated findings from the NIFA OREI project "A whole farm approach incorporating pasture raised organic poultry and a novel cereal grain (Naked Oats) into an organic rotation"

In 2013, this research project group presented an eOrganic webinar which discussed how novel grains and pastured organic broiler chickens could be valuable additions to a multi-year organic rotation program on small-scale farms, as well as results from experiments in which pastured organic broilers (commercial, RedBros) have been fed diets containing 75% naked oats. It's not required, but if you'd like to watch a recording of the 2013 webinar, you can find it here, and be sure to register for the new webinar in advance to learn more about the project findings!

About the Presenters:

Michael Lilburn is a Professor and the Unit Supervisor of the Poultry Research Center in the Department of Animal Sciences at the Ohio State University.

Larry Phelan is a Professor in the Department of Entomology at the Ohio State University.

System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. Find more detailed system requirements here.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars here.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16097

Growing Vegetables and Fruit without Irrigation in Northern California and the Maritime Pacific Northwest

jeu, 2016/01/07 - 12:22

Join eOrganic for a webinar about dry farming on February 19, 2016 at 4PM Eastern Time (3PM Central, 2PM Mountain, 1PM Pacific Time). The webinar is free and open to the public, and advance registration is required.

Register now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3317442457039111169

About the Webinar

Interested in learning more about how to grow fruits and vegetables with little or no water in the Pacific Northwest? This session will cover site selection, dry farming tools and techniques for orchard and row crops, soil hydrological principals, and the power of seed-saving in dry farmed systems. Learn about the OSU Small Farms Dry Farming Demonstration and Participatory Research Project led by Amy Garrett (OSU Small Farms Instructor). Jacques Neukom (Neukom Family Farm), known for his dry farmed peaches and melons in Northern California, will share his experience producing a variety of crops using dry farming techniques all season long in a climate with long dry hot summers. Steve Peters (Seed Revolution Now & Organic Seed Alliance) will tell the story of the ‘Dark Star’ Zucchini developed with Dr. John Navazio and Bill Reynolds for dry farmed systems and how seed-saving can be a powerful tool for dry farmers.

System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. Find more detailed system requirements here.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars here.


This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16085

Wild Bee Monitoring, Identification, and Outreach in Organic Farming Systems Webinar

mer, 2016/01/06 - 18:13

Join eOrganic for a webinar on February 10th, 2016 on Wild Bee Monitoring, Education and Outreach in Organic Farming Systems! The webinar is free and open to the public and advance registration is required. The webinar will take place at 2PM Eastern time, which is 1PM Central, 12PM Mountain and 11AM Pacific Time.

Register now at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2306293081212493826

About the Webinar

Monitoring is an essential component of wild bee conservation and restoration. In this webinar, we deliver basic wild bee identification and monitoring tools for organic farmers, and discuss how these tools can be implemented as part of the Organic Systems Plan (OSM). Furthermore, we will specifically address our outreach methods for wild bee monitoring and identification, the results of these efforts, and future directions for this program. This webinar will also feature a guest presenter, Rosy Smit, certified organic farm manager of Camp Korey in Carnation, Washington. Smit, host of our 3 year WSU wild bee research program, will discuss how Camp Korey integrates bee conservation and education on their organic farm, and how our research program is helping to shape these efforts. This webinar is applicable to organic farmers and the general public who would like to start monitoring bees, and researchers interested in developing outreach programs.

About the Presenters

Elias Bloom is a PhD student in Entomology in the lab of Dr. David Crowder and Washington State University. His research focuses on the biology and ecology of native bee pollinators in diversified organic farming systems.

Rosy Smit has worked in many facets of the agriculture industry for the past two decades as a researcher, environmental farm planning advisor, public educator, consultant and farmer. She completed a B.Sc. in Agroecology as well as a M.Sc. in Soil Science from the University of British Columbia, and currently manages the certified organic farm at Camp Korey, a residential camp that empowers children and families living with serious medical conditions through year-round, life-changing experiences.

System Requirements

Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar.  If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome. Find more detailed system requirements here.

Find all upcoming and archived eOrganic webinars here.

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 16084

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